Thesis Topic Details

Topic ID:
3068
Title:
Designing effective instructional animations
Supervisor:
Nadine Marcus
Research Area:
HCI, Learning and Teaching, Psychology
Associated Staff
Assessor:
Paul Ayres
Topic Details
Status:
Active
Type:
Research
Programs:
CS CE BIOM BINF SE
Group Suitable:
No
Industrial:
No
Pre-requisites:
Completion of a Human Computer Interaction or Psychology course is essential. An ability to conduct a basic scientific study and a willingness to do some background reading into Cognitive Load Theory is needed. Skills in producing basic graphics/animation will also be needed.
Description:
This project will involve creating and comparing two simple websites/applications/tasks with and without animation. Some user data will then need to be collected and statistically analysed to establish conditions under which animation is most useful.

There will be a focus on comparing animations for human movement based tasks with those for mechanical tasks.

A credit grade or higher are needed for an HCI or similar course.

Some recent publications in this domain that include data from a few of my honours students are as follows:
Wong, A., Marcus, N., Ayres, P., Smith, L, Cooper, G., Paas, F. & Sweller, J. (2009). Instructional Animations can be Superior to Statics when Learning Human Motor Skills. Computers in Human Behaviour, Vol 25(2), p 339-347.;
Ayres, P., Marcus, N., Chan, C. & Qian, N. (2009). Learning Hand Manipulative Tasks: When Instructional Animations are Superior to Equivalent Static Representations. Computers in Human Behaviour, Vol 25(2), p 348-353.;
Van Gog, T., Paas, F., Marcus, N., Ayres, P., & Sweller, J. (2009). The Mirror Neuron System and Observational Learning: Implications for the Effectiveness of Dynamic Visualizations. Educational Psychological Review, 21(1), 21-30.
Comments:
This topic will be co-supervised by Dr Paul Ayres an expert in instructional animations within the School of Education Studies.
Past Student Reports
 
No Reports Available. Contact the supervisor for more information.

Check out all available reports in the CSE Thesis Report Library.

NOTE: only current CSE students can login to view and select reports to download.