Thesis Topic Details

Topic ID:
3123
Title:
Simulating Cities
Supervisor:
Andrew Taylor
Research Area:
Simulation, Computing, Virtual Reality
Associated Staff
Assessor:
Topic Details
Status:
Active
Type:
R & D
Programs:
CS CE SE
Group Suitable:
Yes
Industrial:
No
Pre-requisites:
no high-powered maths involved, but you have to be comfortable programming simple calculations/simulations with numercial data
Description:
Do you like playing SimCity, but want to do it for real, with real data, on a real city? Understanding how cities function is important for us to answer many important questions: how will we house the next 10 million people? How will our urban transport systems cope with this? How can we do this in ways that are socially, economically, and environmentally sound? These are the sort of questions that urban modelling/analysis seeks to address. Honours projects in this area would require capable students to contribute to the development of an urban simulation model, initially for Sydney, but capable of being extended to other urban areas. I

Interested students can look at UrbanSIM (http://www.urbansim.org/) or TRESIS (http://sydney.edu.au/business/itls/tresis), either of which could be used/extended. Students interested in doing something from scratch are also welcome, but should probably have something specific in mind, as writing urban simulation software from scratch is probably too big for an honours project.

Depending on your interests and abilities, there are three different styles of honours project that could be done:

1. Analytical work [Includes significant non-coding components]:
Examples:
* analyzing transport and land-use data to find out whether the
desirability of living in different suburbs changes in response to
changes to transport infrastructure.
* analyzing changes to employment locations over time
2. Infrastructure coding:
Examples:
* extending urbanSIM, and/or writing code that allows existing data held
by NSW government to be imported/used within UrbanSIM.
* writing software to do transport route-planning and export that to
google maps (see www.google.com/transit)
3. Visualization:
Example:
* Writing software to convert existing data into KML for visualization in
Google Earth


This work will be jointly supervised by Dr Peter Rickwood (peter.rickwood@isf.uts.edu.au) at UTS - Peter now works on transport&urban planning but did his undergrad in computing@CSE.
Comments:
Past Student Reports
  Peter Johannes SCHMIDT in s2, 2011
Simulating Cities
 

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