Appalachian School of Law Shootings
       

You can see the part of each story below that mentions how Peter O. was captured here, while an index is here

Wed, 16 Jan 2002

Gunman shoots six at Virginia law school in Appalachian foothills


The Associated Press

A gunman killed three people and wounded three others during a shooting spree Wednesday at the Appalachian School of Law, officials said.

Among the dead was the dean, Anthony Sutin, said Ellen Qualls, spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner. She said a student and another member of the faculty were also killed.

State police believe students apprehended the suspect, Qualls said.

Three students were wounded and taken to Buchanan General Hospital, Qualls said. She said the weapon was a .380 semiautomatic handgun.

A man who answered the phone at the law school refused to comment.

The Buchanan County law school opened in 1997 in a renovated junior high school. The school’s enrollment is about 170.

Grundy is in the Appalachian foothills, 120 miles west of Roanoke.

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Three slain, three wounded during shooting spree at western Virginia law school

Roger Alford
The Associated Press

A law school student upset about his grades went on a shooting spree Wednesday, killing three people and critically wounding three others before he was wrestled to the ground by students, officials said.

The victims included the dean of the Appalachian School of Law and a professor who were gunned down in their offices. The third person slain was a student, said Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, who has a private practice a half-mile from the school in this tiny western Virginia community.

Briggs said he had treated the suspect in the past year. He described the gunman as a Nigerian in his early 40s who had flunked out last year and been allowed to return.

“I think they were getting ready to tell him that he had not made the grade this year,” Briggs said.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and the professor were “executed” in their offices, Briggs said.

He said the gunman then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing one and wounding three others. He was tackled by four male students as he left the building.

“They just wanted the guy,” Briggs said. “They weren’t worried about their own personal safety.”

Other details were not immediately available, but Qualls said the weapon used was a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun.

The three wounded students were taken to Buchanan General Hospital, Qualls said. The governor said they were in critical condition.

“We knew before we heard there was a shooting that something was wrong,” said Tiffany Street, who works at a nearby motel. “There were fire trucks, ambulances, state police and cops all heading toward the school.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Street, 20. “Grundy’s a very small town, and I’ve been here all my life.”

The private law school has an enrollment of about 170 students.

The governor, who had served on the school’s board until he took office last week, said he was shocked and saddened by the shooting.

“I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect, who is now in custody,” Warner said. “My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School founders hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999.

The school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000. There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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Shooting rampage at Va. law school kills three, leaves three others wounded


The Associated Press

A struggling Nigerian law school student went on a campus shooting spree Wednesday, killing the dean, a professor and a student before he was tackled by students, authorities said.

The attack also wounded three students at the Appalachian School of Law. Two were in surgery Wednesday evening and the third was listed in fair condition.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, who was one of the first to arrive after the shooting in this tiny mountain community in western Virginia.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. Police said the third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33.

The 42-year-old suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, had arrived at school to meet with the dean about his academic suspension, which went into effect Wednesday, State Police spokesman Mike Stater said.

Alleged shoe bomber accused of being trained al-Qaida terrorist

BOSTON (AP) - The airline passenger accused of trying to ignite explosives in his shoes was indicted Wednesday on charges of being an al-Qaida-trained terrorist whose goal was to blow up the plane and kill the nearly 200 people aboard.

Richard Reid, a 28-year-old British citizen and convert to Islam, could get five life sentences if convicted.

The indictment, issued by a federal grand jury in Boston, alleges Reid attempted to kill the 197 passengers and crew aboard a Paris-to-Miami American Airlines flight Dec. 22 before he was tackled and the jetliner was diverted to Boston.

Reid did “attempt to use a weapon of mass destruction … consisting of an explosive bomb placed in each of his shoes,” the indictment said

The indictment said Reid “received training from al-Qaida in Afghanistan.”

Three former SLA members arrested in deadly 1975 bank robbery near Sacramento

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Five former members of the Symbionese Liberation Army, including former fugitive Sara Jane Olson, were charged Wednesday in connection with a deadly bank robbery carried out 27 years ago.

Three of the former members of the SLA, the 1970s radical group that kidnapped newspaper heiress Patty Hearst, were taken into custody at their homes, authorities said. Olson, known as Kathleen Soliah at the time of the robbery, was expected to turn herself in later Wednesday in Los Angeles. The fifth suspect remained at large.

Olson, Emily Harris, ex-husband Bill Harris, Mike Bortin and James Kilgore were charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of a bank customer during a 1975 holdup in the suburb of Carmichael, authorities said.

Emily Harris was arrested at her home in Los Angeles, her ex-husband was taken into custody in Oakland, and Bortin was arrested in Portland, Ore. Kilgore has remained at large since the 1970s.

“Now is the time to seek justice for Myrna Opsahl,” the woman slain during the robbery, Sacramento District Attorney Jan Scully said. Arraignments were scheduled Friday.

Fired auditor knew back in August that Enron whistleblower was warning people about accounting practices

WASHINGTON (AP) - A senior auditor questioned Wednesday in the Enron affair knew back in August that a company whistle-blower was warning about the energy giant’s financial practices that eventually led it into bankruptcy, congressional investigators said.

The whistle-blower, Enron executive Sherron Watkins, told a friend and former colleague at the Arthur Andersen accounting firm about her concerns, which focused on outside partnerships used by Enron executives to keep hundreds of millions of dollars off the company’s books.

A hurried meeting took place Aug. 21 and Andersen’s chief auditor for the Enron account, David Duncan, participated. The Arthur Andersen meeting took place the day before Watkins detailed her concerns in a meeting with Enron Chairman Ken Lay.

“It’s now clear to us that key players at Andersen as well as Enron knew of the growing problems months before the company imploded,” said Ken Johnson, spokesman for the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Committee investigators questioned Duncan for several hours Wednesday in what Republican and Democratic committee staffers said was a valuable information-gathering session provided many leads to investigators.

U.S. believes al-Qaida not yet able to produce chemical or biological weapons

WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. officials have tentatively concluded Osama bin Laden’s terrorist group, al-Qaida, had not developed the means to produce chemical, biological or radiological weapons at the time the United States began bombing Afghanistan in October.

Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Wednesday that weeks of searching more than 40 sites in Afghanistan yielded diagrams, materials and reports that indicated “an appetite for weapons of mass destruction.”

“In terms of having hard evidence of actual possession of weapons of mass destruction, I do not have that at this stage,” he told a Pentagon news conference.

Of 50 suspected al-Qaida sites identified so far, 45 have been thoroughly examined, officials said.

Rumsfeld said there may yet be an exception to his statement that no terror weapons have been found. He said he had been shown photos of canisters found recently at a former al-Qaida site in Afghanistan which could contain chemical agents. Their contents have yet to be examined, he said.

AIDS overwhelms vaccine protection in Harvard monkey study

By The Associated Press

In a study that illustrates how cunning a foe AIDS is, a monkey that was given an experimental AIDS vaccine died after the virus changed just one of its genes.

HIV, which causes AIDS, already is known to mutate and grow impervious to standard AIDS drugs in at least half of all Americans being treated for the infection.

Now researchers have seen a similar outcome with an experimental vaccine that tries to stop the virus from multiplying. The mutation occurred in one of eight vaccinated rhesus monkeys in a Harvard experiment.

The findings were published in Thursday’s issue of the journal Nature.

Scientists who reviewed the results described the monkey’s death as “more disappointing than surprising.”

It does not mean that AIDS vaccines are doomed to fail, they said, but illustrates how the virus will not be easily defeated or even contained anytime soon.

Kmart stock sinks to under $2 amid bankruptcy speculation

DETROIT (AP) - Shares of Kmart Corp. stock dropped below $2 Wednesday as credit agencies cut its debt ratings amid speculation the discount retailer is considering filing for bankruptcy.

Kmart has been struggling to compete against the lower prices of rivals Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Target Corp., battling the nationwide recession while mounting its aggressive restructuring effort.

In a news release announcing ratings downgrades, Fitch Inc. said it appears increasingly likely Kmart will choose to file for bankruptcy.

Sources close to the company, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity, said the possibility of filing for Chapter 11 was discussed at a regularly scheduled meeting of Kmart’s board of directors this week. So far, the company has remained silent on its financial future.

Robin Williams turns menacing in somber thriller ‘One Hour Photo’

PARK CITY, Utah (AP) - Robin Williams has provided some of the darkest and lightest moments at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

First, he menaced the crowds with “One Hour Photo,” a grim story in which he plays a joyless photo clerk who dangerously fixates on a family. Then, Williams had people rolling in the aisles as he turned a question-and-answer session on the movie into an impromptu standup routine.

“This was a bizarre, creepy movie. Now coming up and making people laugh, it’s like being an emotional sorbet,” Williams said after the movie’s premiere last weekend.

Williams cracked wise on why he chose such a dark role (“Because Mr. Rogers On Ice was already taken”), on his character’s fuzzy blondish hair (“They cut my hair with a Roto-Rooter”), on security for upcoming Winter Olympics events around Park City (anthrax-antsy guards shouting, “There’s white powder everywhere!” then being told, “It’s snow, sir”).

Best-known for sympathetic, lovable characters in such films as “Good Will Hunting” and “Dead Poets Society,” Williams has three movies coming out this year in which he plays the heavy. Preceding “One Hour Photo,” which opens this fall, Williams plays a murder suspect opposite Al Pacino in “Insomnia” and a former children’s show host gunning for revenge against the man who replaced him in the black comedy “Death to Smoochy,” directed by Danny DeVito.

Sackmaster Strahan beats Urlacher for Defensive Player honors

By The Associated Press

The sack has become the most glorified defensive play in the NFL, a major reason why Michael Strahan is The Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year.

Strahan, who set an NFL record with 22 1/2 sacks for the New York Giants, earned a seven-vote margin over Chicago linebacker Brian Urlacher in balloting announced Wednesday.

“Only seven,” Strahan said with a huge smile that showed off his famous gap-tooth look. “I’m disappointed, but I’ll take it.”

Nothing was disappointing about the defensive end’s performance this season.

Strahan, one of the league’s most popular players for his outgoing, entertaining yet humble manner, always has been a fearsome pass rusher. He was a force against the run this season, too, and, with linebacker Jessie Armstead and the rest of New York’s defense plagued by inconsistency, Strahan was Mr. Reliable.

So much so that he was a unanimous choice to the AP All-Pro team last week.

“I don’t try to make every play perfect, I just try to make sure every play counts,” Strahan said, “because you never know which plays are going to count in a game.

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Shooting rampage at Virginia law school kills three, leaves three wounded

Roger Alford
The Associated Press

A student who had been dismissed from law school went on a campus shooting spree Wednesday, killing the dean, a professor and a student before he was tackled by students, authorities said.

The attack also wounded three female students at the Appalachian School of Law. They were hospitalized in fair condition.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, one of the first to arrive after the shooting in this tiny mountain community in western Virginia.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. Police said the third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33.

Authorities said the 42-year-old suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, had arrived at school to meet with the dean about his academic dismissal, which went into effect Wednesday.

Briggs said Odighizuwa, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Nigeria, had flunked out last year and been allowed to return to the school.

Odighizuwa first stopped in the office of Professor Dale Rubin to talk about his grades and as he left reportedly asked Rubin to pray for him, police said. Rubin, reached by telephone, declined to comment.

He then walked to Sutin’s and Blackwell’s offices and shot them with a .380-caliber pistol, State Police spokesman Mike Stater said. Blackwell had taught contract law to Odighizuwa.

Witnesses said Odighizuwa then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing Dales and seriously wounding three others.

Todd Ross, 30, of Johnson City, Tenn., was among the students who were outside when Odighizuwa left the building. Ross said the suspect was holding his hands in the air and dropped the gun at his prompting.

Odighizuwa was promptly tackled and “struggled after we got him on the ground, but then just laid there,” Ross said. He said the suspect kept shouting, “‘I have nowhere to go. I have nowhere to go.”’

The suspect was being held at the Buchanan County Jail on three counts of capital murder and three weapons counts, authorities said.

Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, said Odighizuwa had a history of mental instability that school officials knew about.

First-year student Justin Marlowe from Richwood, W.Va., said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

He also said that after Odighizuwa flunked out a year ago, “the dean bent over backward to get him enrolled again.”

The private law school, with an enrollment of about 170 students, was closed for the rest of the week.

School president Lucius Ellsworth was meeting with government officials in Richmond and flew back when he learned of the shootings.

“Each of us is suffering, but as a family, we can find strength to pass through this terrible dark and tragic valley,” he said.

The governor, who had served on the school’s board until he took office last week, said he was shocked by the shooting.

“I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect,” Warner said. “My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to help found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

Attorney General John Ashcroft issued a statement expressing his condolences to Sutin’s wife and their two children.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School officials hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999, but the school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000.

There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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Shooting at Va. Law School Kills 3

Roger Alford
Associated Press Online

A student who had been dismissed from law school went on a campus shooting spree Wednesday, killing the dean, a professor and a student before he was tackled by students, authorities said.

The attack also wounded three female students at the Appalachian School of Law. They were hospitalized in fair condition.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, one of the first to arrive after the shooting in this tiny mountain community in western Virginia.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. Police said the third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33.

Authorities said the 42-year-old suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, had arrived at school to meet with the dean about his academic dismissal, which went into effect Wednesday.

Briggs said Odighizuwa, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Nigeria, had flunked out last year and been allowed to return to the school.

Odighizuwa first stopped in the office of Professor Dale Rubin to talk about his grades and as he left reportedly asked Rubin to pray for him, police said. Rubin, reached by telephone, declined to comment.

He then walked to Sutin’s and Blackwell’s offices and shot them with a .380-caliber pistol, State Police spokesman Mike Stater said. Blackwell had taught contract law to Odighizuwa.

Witnesses said Odighizuwa then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing Dales and seriously wounding three others.

Todd Ross, 30, of Johnson City, Tenn., was among the students who were outside when Odighizuwa left the building. Ross said the suspect was holding his hands in the air and dropped the gun at his prompting.

Odighizuwa was promptly tackled and “struggled after we got him on the ground, but then just laid there,” Ross said. He said the suspect kept shouting, “‘I have nowhere to go. I have nowhere to go.”’

The suspect was being held at the Buchanan County Jail on three counts of capital murder and three weapons counts, authorities said.

Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, said Odighizuwa had a history of mental instability that school officials knew about.

First-year student Justin Marlowe from Richwood, W.Va., said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

He also said that after Odighizuwa flunked out a year ago, “the dean bent over backward to get him enrolled again.”

The private law school, with an enrollment of about 170 students, was closed for the rest of the week.

School president Lucius Ellsworth was meeting with government officials in Richmond and flew back when he learned of the shootings.

“Each of us is suffering, but as a family, we can find strength to pass through this terrible dark and tragic valley,” he said.

The governor, who had served on the school’s board until he took office last week, said he was shocked by the shooting.

“I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect,” Warner said. “My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to help found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

Attorney General John Ashcroft issued a statement expressing his condolences to Sutin’s wife and their two children.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School officials hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999, but the school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000.

There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

/duplicates | 270

Shooting rampage at Virginia law school kills three, leaves three others wounded

Roger Alford
Associated Press Worldstream

A struggling Nigerian law school student went on a campus shooting spree, killing the dean, a professor and a student before he was tackled by students, authorities said.

The attack also wounded three students at the Appalachian School of Law. Two were in surgery Wednesday evening and the third was listed in fair condition.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, who was one of the first to arrive after the shooting in this tiny mountain community in western Virginia.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. Police said the third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33.

The 42-year-old suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, had arrived at school to meet with the dean about his academic suspension, which went into effect Wednesday, State Police spokesman Mike Stater said.

Odighizuwa first stopped in the office of Professor Dale Rubin to talk about his grades and as he left reportedly asked Rubin to pray for him, police said.

He then walked to Sutin’s and Blackwell’s offices and shot them with a .380-caliber pistol, Stater said. Witnesses said Odighizuwa then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing Dales and seriously wounding three others.

Todd Ross, 30, of Johnson City, Tennessee, was among the students who were outside when Odighizuwa left the building. Ross said the suspect was holding his hands in the air and dropped the gun at his prompting.

Odighizuwa was promptly tackled and “struggled after we got him on the ground, but then just laid there,” Ross said. He said the suspect kept shouting, “‘I have nowhere to go. I have nowhere to go.”’

The suspect was being held at the Buchanan County Jail on three counts of capital murder and three weapons counts, authorities said.

Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, said Odighizuwa had a history of mental instability that school officials knew about. Rubin, the professor who spoke with the suspect moments before the rampage, declined comment after the shooting.

First-year student Justin Marlowe from Richwood, West Virginia, said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

He also said Odighizuwa had flunked out a year ago and “the dean bent over backward to get him enrolled again.”

The private law school, with an enrollment of about 170 students, was closed for the rest of the week.

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to help found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

Attorney General John Ashcroft issued a statement expressing his condolences to Sutin’s wife and their two children.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles (kilometers) south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

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URGENT-Virgina-School-Shooting


Broadcast News (BN)

GRUNDY, Virginia—There has been another school shooting in the United States.

Police in Virginia say as many as six people have been shot at the Appalachian School of Law.

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GRUNDY, Virginia—More school violence in the United States, this time in Grundy, Virginia.


Broadcast News (BN)

GRUNDY, Virginia—More school violence in the United States, this time in Grundy, Virginia.

Officials say a gunman has killed three people and wounded three others during a shooting rampage at the Appalachian School of Law.

Among the dead is the dean.

A spokeswoman says a student and another member of the faculty were also killed.

She says state police believe students apprehended a suspect.

The weapon was a .380 semi-automatic handgun.

Grundy is in the Appalachian foothills, 190 kilometres west of Roanoke.

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Virginia-School-Shooting-Update (injured in hospital)


Broadcast News (BN)

GRUNDY, Virginia—A gunman killed three people and wounded three others during a shooting rampage at a lawschool in Grundy, Virginia.

The dead include a student, a faculty member and the dean of the Appalachian School of Law.

State police believe students apprehended the suspect.

The weapon was a .380-calibre semi-automatic handgun.

Three wounded students were taken to hospital.

The law school, with an enrolment of about 170 students, opened in 1997 in a renovated junior high school in this small town about 200 kilometres west of Roanoke.

It graduated its first class of 34 in 2000.

The school has about 15 faculty members.

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Three killed and three wounded at a Virginia law school


CBS Evening News (6:30 PM ET) - CBS

JOHN ROBERTS, anchor:

A doctor who responded to a shooting at a Virginia law school today says when he arrived, there were bodies lying everywhere. It happened at the Appalachian School of Law in the Blue Ridge Mountain town of Grundy. Three people were killed, including the school’s dean, and three others wounded before students tackled the suspect. He is described as a student from Nigeria, angered over poor grades.

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Interview with Tim Baylor

Judy Woodruff
CNN Live Today 10:00

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JUDY WOODRUFF, CNN ANCHOR: We now have the first pictures coming in from southwest Virginia, where a gunman has killed three people and wounded three others during a shooting spree at the Appalachian School of Law.

The dean of the school was among those killed. The dean, named L. Anthony Sutton, was a former acting assistant U.S. attorney general, and we are told he was also chief counsel for Al Gore’s 2000 presidential campaign.

The gunman who was identified as a fellow student now is in state police custody after he was tackled by other students. Joining us now on the telephone is a spokesman for the Wellmont Health Systems, which runs the two hospitals where’s the three who were wounded are being treated.

Tim Baylor is joining us. Tim, are you there on the phone?

TIM BAYLOR, WELLMONT HEALTH SYSTEMS: Yes, Judy.

WOODRUFF: Tell us about the condition of the three?

BAYLOR: There were three patients that were transferred from Grundy to on two hospitals in the Wellmont system. Two patients were transferred to Wellmont (UNINTELLIGIBLE) Valley Medical Center in Kingsport. One patient is currently in surgery and the second is listed in fair condition. The third patient was transferred to Wellmont Bristol Regional Medical Center in Bristol, Tennessee. And that patient is also currently in surgery.

WOODRUFF: So, Can you tell us anything about the injury or the injuries to those who are in surgery? You said the second person is in fair condition?

BAYLOR: Correct. That’s right. We do not know condition the yet of those in surgery. We are still waiting to have more information on our end as well.

WOODRUFF: And do you know anything about how many times they were shot or where they were shot?

BAYLOR: No, I don’t.

WOODRUFF: Anything to identify them?

BAYLOR: No. I can tell you that all three were female, but I cannot—don’t have names to give you at this time.

WOODRUFF: You don’t know if they were students or faculty or something else?

BAYLOR: I believe all three were students.

WOODRUFF: All three were students. All right. Tim Baylor is a spokesman for the Wellmont Health Systems, which as you heard him say, runs two hospitals, one in Kingsport, Tennessee, the other one in Bristol, Tennessee. And at these hospitals the three who were wounded in this shooting incident are being treated.

You heard him say one person in fair condition, the other two in surgery. We don’t know much more than that. He did say all three are women. Beyond that we know that three people were killed in the shooting spree at the Appalachian School of Law. Among those dead: The dean of the school who’s name is L. Anthony Sutton. As soon as we get more information we will bring it to you. TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

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Are Conditions Humane for Detainees?

Wolf Blitzer, Bob Franken, Jamie McIntyre, Christiane Amanpour
CNN Wolf Blitzer Reports 19:00

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

WOLF BLITZER, ANCHOR: Tonight on WOLF BLITZER REPORTS: THE WAR ROOM, more al Qaeda and Taliban prisoners arrive at the U.S. base in Cuba.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DONALD RUMSFELD, SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: We are looking at all of those people and asking them a great many questions.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLITZER: Where are their leaders? What do they know about Taliban American John Walker? And what do they know about alleged shoe bomber Richard Reid?

We’ll go to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Pentagon and to another potential battleground: Somalia. And I’ll speak live with former CIA director James Woolsey, former deputy attorney general Eric Holder, and CNN military analyst, retired Air Force Major General Don Shepperd, as we go into the WAR ROOM.

Good evening. I’m Wolf Blitzer reporting tonight from Washington. The U.S. has now moved 80 al Qaeda and Taliban detainees to the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Hundreds more are expected there in the days and weeks ahead. Security on the base is extraordinary. But today, reports of chilling threats from some of the detainees already there.

They’re caged and closely guarded, but those al Qaeda and Taliban prisoners would seem to have plenty of fight left in them. CNN national correspondent Bob Franken is on the base at Guantanamo Bay, and joins us now by phone.

What is the latest, Bob?

BOB FRANKEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Wolf, the comments about the threats came in the context of a defense by the head of the security here, General Michael Leonard, Marine Brigadier General, who is running the show, defense about the treatment and charges that it has not been humane.

Here is he what he said: “These are not nice people. Several have told us their intentions to kill an American before they leave Guantanamo Bay. We will not give them that opportunity.” What he was saying is, is that as much as possible they are being treated along the guidelines of the Geneva Convention, which effects prisoners of war. It’s a convention—a treaty that goes back several decades, but they are not, in fact, rigidly adhering to it because they don’t consider these detainees, as they call them, P.O.W.s. That would bring certain legal obligations.

Whatever they are, 30 more arrived today from the other side of the world, got the same very heavy security treatment as they left their planes wearing the same bright orange jump suits, that brings to 80 the number who are being kept there. The capacity now is about 200 by the end of the month and before three months is up, and there is a reason to mention that, before three months is up, this out door prison with its cages, its outdoor cells, will be able to handle 600 detainees.

It is camp X-ray. It is the temporary place that is being used as a detention center while a modular building is going up at another site here, a modular building which will ultimately be able to handle as many as 2,000 of the detainees. So, these figures are constantly changing, but they are planning for the long haul here and they are saying it is going to be a long haul that is extremely dangerous.

As for the treatment of the prisoners, tomorrow the International Red Cross representatives are supposed to visit. General Leonard says it’s his intention that the representatives will be able to visit with each and every detainee. These have way of changing, these different approaches to things. But in any case the International Red Cross, which is supposed to monitor such things will begin its monitoring tomorrow—Wolf.

BLITZER: Bob Franken from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Thanks for that report.

The United States of course, wants to gather as much intelligence as it can from the detainees, especially on the whereabouts of their leaders. Let’s go live to the Pentagon now. Our CNN military affairs correspondent Jamie McIntyre is standing by there—Jamie.

JAMIE MCINTYRE, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Wolf, the Pentagon has literally dozens and dozens of intelligence reports indicating where Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar might be. Some of them are very specific. Some of them are clearly wrong. But from all of these, the Pentagon has put together a little bit of a picture and right now it still points to both men being in Afghanistan. At the least that’s what the top man at Pentagon here thinks.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(voice-over): Despite conflicting intelligence reports about the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, including some assessments that he has slipped into another country, the best U.S. guess is that he, and Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, are both still in Afghanistan.

RUMSFELD: We don’t know precisely where he is. We have a good sense in the country. We still believe they are in the country. We are still working on that basis, although we are looking in some other places as well from time to time.

MCINTYRE: What intelligence experts do agree on is that both bin Laden and Omar are likely still alive. One Congressman, Arizona Republican Jim Kolbe, who is traveling in the region, says he’s been briefed that U.S. intelligence reports put Omar “west and northwest of Kandahar with some of his loyal followers of the Taliban.”

Meanwhile the Pentagon continues to collect evidence that bin Laden’s al Qaeda network were desperate to acquire chemical, biological or nuclear weapons.

RUMSFELD: We have found a number of things that show an appetite for weapons of mass destruction: Diagrams, materials, reports that things were asked for, things were discussed at meetings, that type of thing.

MCINTYRE: So far 45 of 54 suspected weapons of mass destruction sites have been searched by U.S. troops and weapons or materials have been found. Defense Secretary Rumsfeld today did refer to a pair of canisters that had been unearthed by a British de-mining team, but despite the Russian writing and the scull and crossbones on the outside of those containers, U.S. officials believe they are probably fakes, part of a scam to sell fake material to the al Qaeda. But tests on those canisters will determine that for certain—Wolf.

BLITZER: Jamie, what about that suspected al Qaeda financier who surrendered today at the U.S. base at Kandahar? What is that all about?

MCINTYRE: Well, it could be more or less than meets eye. A man literally showed up at the gate, claimed that he was one of the Taliban tribal elders, that he had contributed money to various al Qaeda causes and they think he might be a major financier. They are questioning him. Right now he is not a detainee, but that status could change.

BLITZER: Jamie McIntyre at the pentagon once again. Thank you very much.

Let’s turn now to Somalia, which has been torn by civil war. There is also a shaky transitional government there that vies for power with a number of warlords. But could Somalia be the next stop in the U.S.-led war on terror? Our Christiane Amanpour joins us now line tonight from Mogadishu, in Somalia—Christiane.

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Wolf, no matter which leader of which faction one talks to, they are all insisting that there is no way that either Osama bin Laden or any of his henchmen could hide here or are hiding here.

They say they have no connection with al Qaeda, and they are obviously very worried that this country will be next on the U.S. bombing list. What many of the war leaders and faction leaders are saying is that they would welcome U.S. intervention here. They would welcome U.S. officials and investigators coming to search for any evidence on al Qaeda or Osama bin Laden, or any kind of terrorism, but that if the U.S. does not find any evidence then they wish the U.S. would stay and help this country rebuild.

Despite that debacle in 1993 when a helicopter crash and an ensuing battle led to 18 American soldiers dead, Somalis are eager to move on and to see whether or not they can get the U.S. back here again and open a new chapter in their relations.

But certainly the situation is that they are very concerned and there is a certain jockeying for power between many of the rival warlords here, jockeying to curry favor with the United States to try to stave off bombing and also perhaps to see whether they can become the U.S. proxies here in Somalia. They are looking very closely at the Afghan model and they see how the U.S. chose the Northern Alliance, of course that was the only cohesive opposition there, but they see that and all of them here, most of them anyway, are trying to see whether or not they can fill that position for the United States here in Somalia—Wolf.

BLITZER: So Christiane, is there a sense on the streets in Mogadishu that Somalia may in fact be the next U.S. target?

AMANPOUR: Well, people are very concerned that that may be the case. Their news sheets, their radios and televisions are full of essentially gossip, innuendo and rumor. There aren’t any hard facts. And in fact, it seems somewhat unlikely, or that it will not be imminent any kind of military act here. Nonetheless, that has done nothing to calm the fears of the people here, especially when they see U.S. journalists and others disembarking in Mogadishu, they get concerned.

They are very worried. People say they are very afraid. They don’t want bombing, obviously. They want friendship with the United States and they are just hoping that the worst doesn’t happen here. Wolf, on the other hand, having said that, they do want the U.S. attention and the western attention. So, while they don’t want bombing, they do want a focus. a new international focus on their country.

BLITZER: Thank you, Christiane for that clarification.

And Christiane, by the way, will have much more at the top of the hour in her SPECIAL REPORT, LIVE FROM SOMALIA.

As it seeks to head-off the next terror attack, how tightly can the United States squeeze the detainees in Cuba? Will the Taliban fighter John Walker get a fair trial in the United States? Joining me now here in the CNN WAR ROOM, Eric Holder, he was deputy attorney general during the Clinton Administration. He’s also a former judge and a former U.S. attorney; CNN military analyst, retired Air Force Major General Don Shepperd; and the former CIA director James Woolsey.

Remember, you can e-mail your WAR ROOM questions to cnn.com/wolf. That’s also where you can read my daily column.

Mr. Director, let me begin with you on this strange case of Richard Reid, the alleged shoe bomber. He received nine counts, charges today for attempting to blow up a plane. I want you to listen to what the Attorney General John Ashcroft said in announcing today’s indictment.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN ASHCROFT, ATTORNEY GENERAL: Reid’s indictment alerts us to a clear, unmistakable threat that al Qaeda could attack the United States again. The lessons for Americans are undeniable. We must be prepared, we must be alert. We must be vigilant.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLITZER: U.S. officials have confirm an incredible story in today’s “Wall Street Journal” to our David Ensor, our national security correspondent, effectively, that they got—they suspect that Richard Reid was on a scouting trip to the Middle East last year, looking for potential terror targets of opportunity.

JAMES WOOLSEY, FORMER CIA DIRECTOR: A lot of information that is suggesting that al Qaeda really wants to use people with European passports. It is a lot easier for them to get into even to Israel, as well as a lot of other places to scout things out.

BLITZER: Is this a case, a slam dunk kind of case for the U.S. attorney in Boston presumably, where this case will be tried?

ERIC HOLDER, FMR. DEP. ATTORNEY GENERAL: It’s a pretty strong case. A substantial number of witnesses will come from the airplane and talk about what he was trying to do. You will have forensic people come up and describe the power of the explosive that he had in his shoe. With the intelligence information that we are now getting, you can connect him to al Qaeda.

So, it seems to me that the case that is drawn up by the United States government is pretty strong.

BLITZER: If you read the story in the “Wall Street Journal” and I recommend it to our viewers who haven’t, it shows al Qaeda meticulously planned terrorist operations and we know that they were sometimes months, if not years in the works.

And presumably they still have some capabilities out there.

MAJ. GEN. DON SHEPPERD (RET.), USAF: Absolutely. There is no question in our mind that these cells exist, sleeper cells all over the world, many of them with plans in the can. And we have to be very vigilant. They are desperate. This is an example of how desperate they are, a man willing to blow himself up from his own shoes and the people that go with him. They are everywhere and we have watch.

BLITZER: Were you surprised at the homework they did in casing various locations for future terrorist attacks?

WOOLSEY: Not after 9/11. This is a worldwide organization. I happen to think it has had some help from time to time from at least one foreign intelligence service, possibly Iraq, possibly Iran. I think Iraq is more likely.

I think they are very careful. They are very thorough. They are in a lot of countries. They know their business and they understand that working in western countries such as Germany and the United States, where civil liberties are strong and there is no domestic spying by a domestic spy agency or anything like that, is the sort of place where they can work the best. And they are taking advantage of that.

BLITZER: Eric Holder, let’s talk about the strange case of John Walker, the Taliban American indicted only yesterday on various counts. Let’s review those counts: Two counts providing material support or resources to terrorists, one count, conspiracy to kill U.S. nationals abroad; one count, engaging in transactions with the Taliban. This is how John Ashcroft, the attorney general, summed up the case against John Walker.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ASHCROFT: Mr. Walker, who is an adult, and who made very serious decisions, very serious decisions against the United States, made some—a decision about his attorney, and no other individual has a right to impose—to impose an attorney on him or to choose an attorney for him. He provided his statements based on his desire to do so in a context that was not coercive.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLITZER: Is that kind of evidence going to be admissible in a federal court?

HOLDER: Well, that’s going to be a real question. He was detained for an extended period of time without the ability to talk to a lawyer and I am sure he will have good defense attorneys, will raise that a federal judge ultimately have to determine that.

But what I think is really important here is the information that your network got from him. It is not information that was gotten by a federal government agent and I think will be admissible. And he makes some pretty damning confessions or admissions in that regard. And I think that’s the information they really have to worry about.

BLITZER: But a good defense lawyer could argue, you know, that he was just being detained. He saw guns, the military, he didn’t know what the hell he was doing?

HOLDER: You know, you can certainly make that argument. I’m not at all certain that’s very convincing if you look at way in which the statements that he makes on camera to CNN, and you put that also in the context of the kinds of things that he did, the admission that he makes about where he was, what he did, the options that he had, and the decisions that he made. As the attorney general indicated, he had a number of options along the way, and it seems that he always took the one that led him to criminality.

BLITZER: The whole military action and holding him the way they did, I guess reading him his Miranda rights if the attorney general is correct and I assume he is correct in saying they did read him the Miranda rights, it sets the stage for this question: Why not use the military court instead of bringing him to a federal court, a civilian court?

SHEPPERD: Well, that is both a political and a legal judgment by the administration if you will. I am sure that was debated many times, what is the best thing to do, but no matter what court he submitted to and now of course, that’s been decided, this kid is in deep, deep trouble and going to face the justice system. he’s got rough road to hoe.

BLITZER: A statement from the Walker family says this, you are an attorney in addition to being a former CIA director, James Woolsey, it says, “We are disappointed, however, that the government has held and interrogated John for 45 days without allowing him any messages from his family or access to his attorney.”

WOOLSEY: Well, as Mr. Holder, said he was detained for a substantial period of time. On the other hand he was in Afghanistan. I mean he was detained overseas by U.S. forces. He was not arrested on the street in New York City or San Francisco where one has access to civilians and counsel and all the rest. And everything I have heard so far would suggest that he has been dealt with humanely and fairly.

Certainly one assumes by this time that U.S. government officials both in defense and Justice Department know how to read people Miranda rights effectively and to (UNINTELLIGIBLE) that. My hunch is that although there will be a challenge to the confession and as Eric says, what was given to CNN may be one of the most interesting parts of the trial, nonetheless, as the general says, this man is in a very deep hole.

BLITZER: All right, stand by, we are going to continue this conversation. We have a lot more to talk about. How would the American public for example, feel if al Qaeda held U.S. prisoners in cages? Stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLITZER: Welcome back. We are talking with our WAR ROOM panel. I want to ask you, Eric Holder, the whole notion of these detainees, 80 of them now, at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, in Cuba, some human rights organizations, not only in the United States, but in Europe and England, other places, saying that the treatment is being unfair, especially being held in changes.

HOLDER: Well I mean they are being held in cells that are outside. They are in Cuba in a tropical climate. It think people have to keep in mind that we are talking about temperatures that I guess are in the 80s during the day. I’m not sure how cold it gets at night. They could be held inside, but it seems to me the difference is not really substantial as long as they are being fed, as long as they are being housed, as long as they have a chance to exercise. The fact that they are inside or outside doesn’t make an awful lot of difference.

BLITZER: Ken Roth, the executive director of Human Rights Watch in New York, said the American public wouldn’t stand for this if American prisoners were being held by al Qaeda or Taliban in cages.

WOOLSEY: I think this is a strain. “Cage” suggests something that is really not the case.

BLITZER: Suggesting they are animals.

WOOLSEY: As Eric says, they seem to be being treated decently. They are in cells. It’s a tropical climate. They are outside but I’m sure, you know, rain storms and circumstances are going to be sheltered. This is really a tempest in a tea pot.

BLITZER: One of the commanders at the base at the Guantanamo Bay said today, their suggesting that some of these detainees are still threatening to kill Americans if they have their way. How good is that security on the base?

SHEPPERD: Well, security is very good. Any time they are out they are going to be surrounded by guards. But they are able to kill Americans. You don’t have to have a weapon to kill somebody. You just have to know how to do it, and you have to be able to attack them physically and we see it in the movies. And it happens in prisons throughout the U.S.

The only thing I would say is that it is not real smart to threaten the Marines.

BLITZER: So what do you do to beef up security to make that kind of contingency impossible?

SHEPPERD: Basically, you put big guys around small guys when they are out and you make sure that you don’t every let your guard down. You can never relax around prisoners in a war situation. As soon as you relax something is going to go wrong. My point is, there is maximum security any time they are out and near our people.

BLITZER: As opposed to John Walker, these are not U.S. citizens. There may be a few British citizens there, but what happens to these guys? Are they just going to stay at Guantanamo Bay forever?

HOLDER: Interesting question. It seems to me you can think of these people as combatants and we are in the middle of a war, and it seems to me that you could probably say, looking at precedent, that you are going to detain these people until war is over, if that is ultimately what we wanted to do.

I think you have a basis for saying that. We had the Vietnam War, we had World War II, people were captured during the course of that war were not repatriated until the conclusion of the conflict. So, it’s possible they could be there for an extended period of time.

BLITZER: I assume the intelligence community would love to interrogate these guys. How do you convince them to come clean and cooperate, if you will.

WOOLSEY: It’s fair game to give people you know. cigarettes or candy, or whatever. You know, there are minor incentives that can be given to people in prison to talk. And these people are not prisoners of war. They are not being regarded that way by the American government.

They are detainees. They were not in uniform. They are not part of a hierarchical structure. They are more analogous to the Germans who were infiltrated into this country as saboteurs in 1942, or a spy or a guerrilla that is captured in combat somewhere abroad.

So, they are covered by some aspects of that Geneva Convention, but not as P.O.W.s, so they don’t really have the rights that a P.O.W. has.

BLITZER: OK, Jim Woolsey, Eric Holder, Donald Shepperd, thanks to all three of you.

We will be back in just a moment with a quick check of this hour’s late developments including a shooting at a Virginia law school that left several dead and wounded. Stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLITZER: Now look at the hour’s late developments beginning with an arrest just announced in a fatal 1975 bank robbery. At a news conference just a short time ago, law enforcement officials said they have charged five former members of Simbianese (ph) Liberation Army with murder in connection with the hold-up of a Sacramento bank and the killing of a customer.

Among the five, Sara Jane Olson, Bill Harris and his former wife Emily Harris. Kidnapped newspaper heiress, Patty Hearst, was involved in the robbery and had give officials information on the crime in 1975.

Three people are dead and three others wounded after a man opened fire at a law school in Grundy, Virginia earlier today. One of those killed was Anthony Suitton (ph), dean of the Appalachian School of Law. The county corner says Suitton and others were shot at point blank range. He said the suspected gunman was a troubled student.

That’s all the time we have tonight. Please join me again tomorrow, twice, at both 5:00 and 7:00 p.m. Eastern. Until then, thanks very much for watching. I’m Wolf Blitzer in Washington. “CROSSFIRE” begins right now. TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

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Three dead in Virginia law school shooting: report


Deutsche Presse-Agentur

Three people were shot dead, including two faculty members, at a law school in Grundy, Virginia, CNN broadcaster reported Wednesday.

The shooting occurred at the Appalachian School of Law, where another three people were injured by the shots. dpa pr

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1ST LEAD: Three dead after student gunman shoots six at law school


Deutsche Presse-Agentur

A student gunmen killed three people and critically injured three more during a rampage Wednesday at a law school in Grundy, Virginia, the local coroner said.

The alleged killer, a foreign student facing expulsion for poor marks from the Appalachian School of Law, “executed” the dean, Anthony Sutin, and another instructor, and shot four students, said Doctor Jack Briggs. Students then overpowered the student, who used a. 38-calibre semi-automatic handgun in the shooting spree, said a spokeswoman for Virginia Governor Mark Warner. The law school is located in the Appalachia mountain range in far-western Virginia, about 500 kilometres west of the U.S. capital city of Washington.

Briggs, also a local physician, told broadcaster CNN he knew the gunman, who had complained of stress “six months ago, seven months ago” and in hindsight had been “a time bomb ready to go off”.

The student had apparently had academic difficulties during his first year at the law school. He came back but again scored low grades and may now have faced expulsion, Briggs said.

“So he took his anger out on the people he felt were responsible for him leaving the school,” the doctor said. “I had no idea it would affect him this way.”

The faculty members were “executed”, said Briggs, who said he found powder burns on the shirt of one victim, indicating he was “obviously shot at point-blank range”.

One of the students injured was shot in the chest, and the other two suffered abdominal wounds, the physician said. They were taken to Buchanan General Hospital, but their condition was no known. dpa fz

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US-SHOOTING (URGENT) THREE DEAD IN SHOOTING AT VIRGINIA LAW SCHOOL


EFE News Service

Washington, Jan 16 (EFE).- Three people were killed and three others wounded Wednesday in a shooting at Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia, authorities said.

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US-SHOOTING (1ST LEAD) THREE DEAD IN SHOOTING AT VIRGINIA LAW SCHOOL


EFE News Service

Washington, Jan 16 (EFE).- Three people were killed and three others wounded Wednesday in a shooting at Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia, authorities said.

A spokesman for the Virginia governor’s office told reporters that according to initial reports, one of the victims was Anthony Sutton, dean of the law school.

No other details were known about the incident, but it appears the perpetrator was overpowered and detained by students.

/nd/tackle | 281

US-SHOOTING (2ND LEAD) THREE DEAD IN SHOOTING AT VIRGINIA LAW SCHOOL


EFE News Service

Washington, Jan 16 (EFE).- Three people were killed and three others wounded Wednesday in a shooting at Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia, authorities said.

A spokesman for the Virginia governor’s office told reporters that according to initial reports, one of the victims was Anthony Sutton, dean of the law school, whose name appears as Sutin on the institution’s Internet Web site.

It appears the perpetrator, whose motives for the shooting remain unclear, was overpowered and detained by students.

Among those who were killed in the incident were a student, an instructor and Sutton, according to Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Virginia Gov. Mark Warner, a former member of the law school’s board of directors.

Five or six people were shot, according to authorities from the southwestern Virginia town of Grundy, who added that the situation is under control.

The wounded were rushed to an area hospital, where they were receiving treatment, authorities noted.

According to Qualls, at least three students were treated at the hospital for gunshot wounds.

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Deadly Shooting at Virginia Law School

Brian Williams; Pete Williams; Robert Hager; Kevin Tibbles; Jim Miklaszewski; Soledad O’Brien; George Lewis; Lisa Myers
The News with Brian Williams 21:00 - MSNBC

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOTBE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

BRIAN WILLIAMS, MSNBC ANCHOR: The man who planned to take down a jetliner with the explosives in his shoes. Tonight, the Justice Department says he is the real deal with ties to the al Qaeda network.

The government deadline for the airline security crackdown. It happens this Friday at an airport near you. But is it a sham? Is it going to be any safer to fly? Eight thousand miles from home and in big trouble. A live report tonight from Guantanamo Bay, home to a new batch of prisoner.

And Enron at issue tonight and the question: Are corporate executives getting away with murder financially? Who should pay for what happened to everyone connected to that company?

ANNOUNCER: From NBC News, this is THE NEWS WITH BRIAN WILLIAMS.

WILLIAMS: Good evening.

When the first reports came in on that Saturday night over the holidays that a man had allegedly tried to light a crude fuse heading to his shoe on board a commercial airliner, he did not appear to be a serious character to a lot of people, certainly not the kind of highly motivated and apparently highly trained terrorist that created the kind of hell of September 11th in this country.

But, today, the U.S. Justice Department told a different story about the almost pathetic-seeming man who was photographed in the back seat of that car being led away from the airport that night in Boston. They say Richard Reid was trained, in fact, by the al Qaeda network, and they’ve now charged him with a number of counts, enough, in fact, to guarantee a lifetime stay in jail, if guilty.

Before we look at the safety of air travel in this country, including the changes that are coming up this Friday, our look at this suspect tonight begins with NBC News justice correspondent Pete Williams.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PETE WILLIAMS, NBC JUSTICE CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): A federal grand jury today accused Reid of receiving training from an al Qaeda terrorist camp and then trying to kill a planeload of people with explosives hidden in his shoes.

Until today, Reid had been charged only with interfering with the flight crewmembers who spotted him trying to ignite the shoe bombs on an American Airlines flight from Paris bound for Miami three days before Christmas.

JOHN ASHCROFT, ATTORNEY GENERAL: Reid’s indictment alerts us to a clear, unmistakable threat that al Qaeda could attack the United States again.

P. WILLIAMS: Among other charges, the grand jury accuses Reid of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction, using a dangerous weapon against the flight crew, and attempting to destroy an airplane. All carry a maximum sentence of life in prison.

The attorney general and the FBI director say the quick action by the flight crew proves that the government’s frequent threat warnings paid off.

ROBERT MUELLER, FBI DIRECTOR: An observant and responsible public is as much a partner to effective law enforcement as any other activity we in law enforcement undertake.

P. WILLIAMS: Meantime today, U.S. law-enforcement officials say they’re studying the contents of these computer, apparently left behind in Afghanistan by al Qaeda members as U.S. forces closed in, in hopes that the contents might shed new light on what Reid was up to.

“Wall Street Journal” reporters bought the computers in Afghanistan and spent weeks decoding and translating the thousands of file they contain. They found one document detailing the travels of an al Qaeda operative called Brother Abdul Ra’uff whose apparent mission was to scout potential terrorist targets in Israel and Egypt, but “Journal” reporters say that operative’s movements appear to match those of Richard Reid right down to the issuing of replacement passports in the same cities.

ANDREW HIGGINS, “THE WALL STREET JOURNAL”: It was a fairly compelling circumstantial evidence that this is the same person.

P. WILLIAMS (on camera): The computer material has been turned over to federal investigators who say it likely does describe Richard Reid, but they say they’ve found nothing definite yet to prove it.

Pete Williams, NBC News, at the Justice Department.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: For more on “The Wall Street Journal“‘s reporting on the similarities between Richard Reid and an al Qaeda operative, we are joined now by the newspaper’s foreign editor. John Bussey is with us tonight from “The Journal“‘s temporary bureau in Lower Manhattan.

John, run through, first of all, what is known about those similar to Richard Reid? Are there any fears at the highest level of the U.S., to your knowledge and the paper’s knowledge, that there are more guys like him out there?

JOHN BUSSEY, “THE WALL STREET JOURNAL”: Well, this story in “The Journal” today by Andy Higgins and Alan Cullison certainly leaves you with that impression.

It’s mostly about a scout who’s been sent out to scope out a variety of possible locations for additional terrorism, not just in the United States. They mentioned the U.N. building. But, in Israel, they mentioned the Wailing Wall and bus depots in Egypt and along the border with Canada where they say, “Look, there are some nightclubs up there where U.S. servicemen frequent.”

So you’re left with the impression that—while there’s—the details are about this one individual who appears to be on some circumstantial evidence Richard Reid, because his itinerary was precisely the same, you’re left with the broader feeling, Brian, that “My gosh, these people are really quite organized. They’re quite intent, and there’s probably more of them.

WILLIAMS: And yet, John, this one fellow, Mr. Reid, as a solo actor, was, you’d have to admit, not very impressive. In fact, we used the word “pathetic” at the top of the broadcast.

He proved once again that the best and only air marshals really that you can count on these days are the citizens who fly on jets. A doctor was able to subdue him with ease.

And is this their best shot?

BUSSEY: Well, it’s probably not their best shot. I mean, we saw a—an extraordinary shot on September 11th. I mean, who would have thought?

You know, the other thing about Richard Reid is I probably have a different opinion about him. I mean, he comes across as a bumbler. rMD+IT_rMDNM_In these correspondences in the story, he’s quite precise. He’s very careful. He covers his tracks very well.

And after all, I think that we were probably seconds, if not than nanoseconds, away from that American Airlines jet blowing up over the ocean. We might right now, Brian, be really reporting about all sorts of speculation. Could it have been a bomb that blew that plane up? It was, you know, a wreckage across the bottom of the ocean, had it not been for the extraordinary luck of a flight attendant wandering by when he lit the match.

WILLIAMS: And point taken about that and the shot that we did take as a nation September 11th. It’s the very fact you’re in a temporary bureau talking to us tonight and not the old venerable headquarters of “The Wall Street Journal”.

John, how worried, baseline here, should Americans be specifically vis-a-vis the reporting “The Journal” has uncovered?

BUSSEY: Well, the end of the files show a—an al Qaeda seemingly in disarray, quite disappointed that Muslims around the world hadn’t risen up. This—these were files that Andy and Alan found dated after September 11th.

So you’re left to feel that while there is disarray—bin Laden’s on the run, his lieutenants are on the run, one has been killed—on the other hand, somewhere between 1,000 and 5,000 people went through those training camps over the years, and as we’ve found in Indonesia, they’re already training other people.

So I think that caution, surveillance, and concern and nervousness are probably smart characteristics to have in the weeks and months ahead.

WILLIAMS: So 170 names of al Qaeda people included in these files. It starts to become a staggering amount of data, a staggering number of characters for the U.S. to track at once.

BUSSEY: Yeah. And the U.S. says—they’ve had a look at the files and at the computers. The U.S. says, among that 170 that—just mentioned in the today’s paper, a lot of new names, people that they didn’t know were al Qaeda listed in the files.

WILLIAMS: John Bussey, thank you very much as always. The foreign editor of “The Wall Street Journal” concerning their reporting in today’s paper.

Remember this so-called shoe bomber was stopped before, questioned once for so long in the airport, he missed his flight originally. But he was ultimately sadly welcomed back on board a commercial flight.

This Friday, two days from now, a tough new aviation security deadline goes into effect in this country. It is fairly apparent tonight two things are going to happen. There will be no great increase in air security. There will be maddening and intolerable delays perhaps across this country.

We have a reality check on this tonight from NBC rMDNM_News correspondent Robert Hager.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ROBERT HAGER, NBC CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Today, the government vows to meet the new airline security laws deadline of this Friday for screening all checked luggage at airport nationwide. Two months ago, Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta said it couldn’t be done. Today, he says it can and will.

NORMAN MINETA, TRANSPORTATION SECRETARY: We will do everything humanly possible to keep these promises.

HAGER: But security experts say there are not nearly enough people, enough bomb-sniffing dogs, or enough explosive-detection machines to really screen more than a small fraction of the four-million bags checked each day. So how can they say they’ll meet deadline?

(on camera): Only because the law permits what some call a huge loophole. Until next year, it allows airlines to say they’ve screened bags if, instead, they simply do what’s called bag matching, ensuring that every bag checked belongs to someone who actually takes the same flight.

(voice-over): It’s based on a theory that no one would plant a bomb aboard the same flight they’re flying. But critics say that’s now nonsense.

PAUL HUDSON, AVIATION CONSUMER ACTION PROJECT: Bag matching doesn’t make complete sense since 9/11 since we now face the threat of suicide terrorists.

HAGER: And airlines will only be required to bag match for a passenger’s first flight, meaning that, for connecting flights, a potentially lethal checked bag could slip aboard, even if the passenger it belongs to doesn’t. Is that really screening?

HUDSON: They should just honestly admit that they haven’t met the deadline and talk about what deadline they can meet.

HAGER: But, today, airlines and the government say this is all they can realistically do for now.

CAROL HALLETT, AIR TRANSPORTATION ASSOCIATION: We anticipate that it’s going to be a pretty smooth start-up.

HAGER: But will require some sacrifices.

Delta says, come Friday, it will no longer take checked bags closer than a half-hour before flight. United warns no more switching flights at the last minute.

A true 100-percent screening will not be required until the next deadline, the end of this year, when the law says every checked bag will actually have to go through an explosive-detection device.

Robert Hager, NBC News, Washington.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: For more now on what’s in store for airline passengers come Friday—there’s a lot to talk about on this subject and whether flying will really be any safer by, say, Saturday morning—we are joined now by a man who spends much of his life on airplanes or at least talking about them, aviation consultant and safety expert Mike Boyd. He is of counsel to several carriers. He is with us tonight from Denver.

Well, Michael, where to begin? How—how pathetic do you find this, the changes we’re about to see? How much of a Band-Aid is it going to be?

MIKE BOYD: Well, I think the DOT has created a physical impossibility. This is a four-chunk, four—a four-link chain. Every link is the weakest link. You’ve got bag matching, you’ve got screening by dogs, you’ve got screening by hand, and you’ve got screening by machines, none of which works real well. It is a scam. There’s no question about it. It’s a sham.

WILLIAMS: So far—it occurred to me listening to Bob Hager’s report for the second time tonight that it’s the passenger who are going to be out here at least short term, and by that, I mean this: no switching flights last minute, no last-minute bags being checked on to flights. We don’t see the airlines being out that much yet because, of course, the equipment hasn’t arrived in the airports and really won’t be for quite some time.

BOYD: Well, that’s true, and the equipment they’re ordering, these CT machines, aren’t going to work very well when they do get them there. There’s such credible evidence that keeps coming in that these things really don’t screen very well. So, come December 31st, if anybody thinks we’re going to be even more secure than we are today, you can just forget it.

The fact is we need some leadership that’s going to go in the right direction, and what we saw today with bag matching—keep in mind that probably 65 percent of all flights—probably more than that, more like 70 percent—have connecting passengers on it. So bag matching isn’t going to do a thing to make us any more secure from terrorists.

WILLIAMS: And we—we can’t say this enough. Bag matching might have worked before the days when we knew there were people who thought nothing of blowing their selves up on board a commercial airliner.

BOYD: Absolutely. And—and for the government to tell us that bag matching is screening for explosives is purely ridiculous. All it does is just try to assume that the person on the first leg of the flight isn’t going to blow themselves up. None of it makes any sense.

And the other three options, the way they’re put together—this isn’t multilayered. It’s just—it’s just multi-amateur. That’s the only way of putting it.

WILLIAMS: I have seen airline passengers who have been through two- and three-hour lines just to go through X-ray to board a plane. It’s reality. It’s happening in this country. They have so far, by and large, been very good and patient citizens.

I need a prediction from you on what Friday’s going to look like around this country, what Saturday’s going to look like, and are people going to go with the program?

BOYD: Well, I think it may be smoother than you think because the real—the real down side would be the matching of the initial bag. I think they can do that better than we might expect. At least I hope so.

But the real issue is all these silly stories where they stick a microphone in the person’s face and say, “Do you mind this delay?” “Oh, no. I’m all for this delay if it means more security.”

What the question really should be is “How foolish do you feel standing in this line when this hasn’t improved security at all?” Then I think we’d have a different answer from the public.

WILLIAMS: Mike, a larger question but not at all beyond your ken. Have thing gone back to normal too quickly? And by that, I mean the people throwing up their hands, saying, “Look, these X-ray machines just can’t be built quickly.”

I was reminded before we went on the air, the United States built a liberty ship every two days for a four-year period during World War II. It can be done.

BOYD: Well, these machine they’re trying to buy probably have the technology of a liberty ship. We’re buying the wrong machines. We’re buying machines that can’t do it. We’re buying politically connected machines rather than machines that can screen for all kinds of explosive and other things in baggage. We’re going in the wrong direction, not the right direction.

We can do it, but the FAA, the DOT, and the government and Congress simply don’t have the gumption to do it, and I don’t think they have the ability to do it right now. But it’s a leadership issue, not a technology issue.

WILLIAMS: I know you’re not a political analyst, but is that leadership you’re calling for at the presidential level—does this president need to make a Rooseveltian address to a joint session of Congress and a national audience watching at home to get it in the right gear?

BOYD: Well, I think what he has to do—it’s his staff doing it. Let’s face it. Since 9/11, Americans cannot be proud of what they’ve seen coming out of the Department of Transportation. What he should do is tell Norman Mineta to go find another job someplace and fire the FAA administrator.

Let’s be real blunt here. They haven’t done a very good job, and it’s time to stop playing politics and start worrying about security because—again, look at breach after breach after breach, and they say we have enhanced security.

Look at that speech today from Mr. Mineta. It was a joke. This is my life and yours and the American public’s. We need to start taking it seriously. Mr. Bush needs to move on that.

WILLIAMS: Veteran aviation consultant and frequent guest of ours, Michael Boyd. Thank you, Michael, as always for coming on tonight.

In rural Virginia tonight, authorities say a law student who opened fire at his school had just been suspended just today. Three people were killed, including the school’s dean, and three others were injured at the tiny Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, just a few miles south of the Kentucky/West Virginia state line.

We get latest now from NBC News correspondent Kevin Tibbles.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

KEVIN TIBBLES, NBC CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Shots rang out at 1:00 this afternoon on the campus of the tiny Appalachian School of Law. By the time the shooter was overpowered, three people were dead, three others wounded.

Police say the 43-year-old suspect is a student from Nigeria who failed last year and who was suspended from school this morning.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: He was kind of a loner, and it was hard to approach him. He was very closed off.

TIBBLES: The shots fired execution style, according to police, from a semi-automatic handgun.

The dead include the dean of the law school, L. Anthony Sutin, a former member of the Clinton administration’s Justice Department. The father of two young children, former law partners say he had a huge heart.

One faculty member and a student were also shot dead, the three injured students rushed to nearby hospitals.

(on camera): State police in Virginia are crediting law students at Appalachian for preventing further loss of life, saying they overpowered the gunman and held him until police could arrive.

PAUL LUND, ASSOCIATE DEAN: The whole community is profoundly shocked and saddened by this tragedy. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family and friends of the victims.

TIBBLES (voice-over): The Appalachian School of Law opened in 1997 to encourage young people in this traditional coal-mining region to study and practice law. It is housed on the campus of a former junior high school and boasts just 170 students and 15 faculty.

A trauma unit has now been set up on the tiny campus to counsel those who have lost friends. A memorial service will be held at the school tomorrow.

Kevin Tibbles, NBC News, Chicago.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: There is a lot more to tell about as we continue after a pause this Wednesday night, including new information on the collapse of Enron and new questions tonight about just how much Andersen accounting really knew about the downward-headed Texas giant. At issue, who should pay for what happened to all those Enron employees who lost everything?

And coming up next, the latest on the American war effort in Afghanistan.

And more tonight on the new battleground shaping up in the Philippines.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: The Pentagon called another 2,400 reserve troops to active duty, we found out this week. That brings the total number of reservists who have been mobilized since September 11th to more than 70,000 now tonight. The move comes as the U.S. military presence in the Philippines continues to build this evening.

We get details now from NBC News Pentagon correspondent Jim Miklaszewski.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JIM MIKLASZEWSKI, NBC PENTAGON CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Even as the war in Afghanistan and the hunt for Osama bin Laden grind on, the U.S. military build-up in the Philippines is well underway.

As of today, some 250 U.S. military forces have arrived. The total number could reach 800 to help the Philippines military destroy Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group with known ties to Osama bin Laden.

DONALD RUMSFELD, SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: There is no question that there had been linkages between al Qaeda and activities that have taken place in the Philippines.

MIKLASZEWSKI: But Defense Secretary Rumsfeld says the Philippines is only the next stop in America’s war on terrorism.

RUMSFELD: If we have to go into 15 more countries, we ought to do to it to deal with the problem of terrorism.

MIKLASZEWSKI: In Afghanistan, coalition forces still dealing with the potential threat from weapons of mass destruction. It was revealed today that, last week, a British military team outside Kabul unearthed a sinister-looking set of canisters at first believed to contain radioactive material.

RUMSFELD: Externally, they’ve got stuff on them that make reasonable people think there’s something not good in there, and we’re going to check them out.

MIKLASZEWSKI: Tests reveal, however, the material is harmless. In fact, the U.S. military has inspected 45 sites and has still found no evidence Osama bin Laden has produced chemical, biological, or radioactive weapons.

But still no sign of America’s two most wanted: Taliban leader Mullah Omar or Osama bin Laden.

(on camera): Military officials here at the Pentagon now believe that some Afghan tribal leaders know exactly where to find Mullah Omar but refuse to give him up. As for the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, they readily admit it’s still anybody’s guess.

Jim Miklaszewski, NBC News, the Pentagon.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: Yet another shipment of prisoners has arrived tonight at the U.S. air base in Cuba, Guantanamo Bay. They are all al Qaeda and Taliban veterans, and they are 8,000 miles from home tonight, bringing the number of prisoners housed there now to 80.

A late update from NBC News correspondent Soledad O’Brien who is at Guantanamo Bay.

SOLEDAD O’BRIEN, NBC CORRESPONDENT: Brian, this afternoon, a C-141 landed on the airstrip here at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. On board, the 30 detainees making the approximately 20-hour-long journey from Kandahar.

The men came off the cargo plane, each one wearing an orange jumpsuit, wearing blacked-out goggles, bound at the hands, shackled at the feet. The Navy has been adamant that we show no pictures of these detainees. They say for security reasons.

We can only tell you that there is a lot of security here, obviously. The men were patted down and then led to one of two really regular school buses. The windows of the school buses blacked out as well. Apparently inside, the seats removed, meaning that the detainees would sit on the floor of the school bus.

Taken to a ferry and then taken off the Camp X-Ray where they are expected to spend the next three months or so.

Earlier today at a briefing, Brigadier General Michael Leonard said that, in addition to the 80 detainees now here at Guantanamo Bay, they are also building more units—and quickly—in the effort to house another 600 or so. He also praised the base medical team, saying that they had been working in the face of some threats from the detainees.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRIG. GEN. MICHAEL LEHNERT, U.S. JOINT TASK FORCE COMMANDER: These are not nice people. Several have publicly stated here their intent to kill an American before they leave Guantanamo Bay. We will not give them that satisfaction.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O’BRIEN: That medical team also investigating some health concerns. It is suspected that some of the detainees may have tuberculosis, and so they are wearing surgical masks. That’s in an effort to protect the Marines that are guarding them.

There has been no interrogation of the detainees as of yet.

The International Red Cross is expected to arrive here tomorrow to examine the conditions under which the detainees are being kept. Brian, back to you.

WILLIAMS: Soledad O’Brien of NBC News from the place they call Getmo (ph), Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, tonight. Thanks.

When we come back, two nuclear powers on the brink of war. Tonight, what it’s all about and what Colin Powell is doing to keep the peace in that region.

And the latest on that blind lion in Afghanistan, how an outpouring of American support is making a very real difference tonight.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: Welcome back to the broadcast at half past the hour.

New criminal charges tonight against Richard Reid, the man suspected of trying to blow up that American Airlines flight over the Atlantic Ocean last month with explosives hidden in his shoes. A federal grand jury today accused Reid of being an al Qaeda-trained terrorist and indicting him on nine separate accounts, including attempted murder and attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction, as they called it.

Secretary of State Colin Powell is in South Asia tonight where he will review U.S. troops in Afghanistan later this week. But, first, he is trying to help Pakistan and India reach some sort of middle ground before the two nuclear nations come any closer to conflict over the border region of Kashmir.

NBC News chief foreign affairs correspondent Andrea Mitchell is traveling with the secretary.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ANDREW MITCHELL, NBC CHIEF FOREIGN AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Colin Powell on a mission to avert another war. This time between India and Pakistan, both armed with nuclear weapons.

COLIN POWELL, SECRETARY OF STATE: We need a campaign against terrorism, not a campaign with these two countries fighting one another.

MITCHELL: It is almost mission impossible. Today, just as he arrives in the region, India raises the stakes, hints that its submarines are already armed with nuclear warheads, a threat Pakistan cannot match.

ADM. MADHEVENDRA SINGH, INDIAN NAVY: The Navy is fully (UNINTELLIGIBLE), its powder is dry and we are ready.

MITCHELL: And Pakistan warns today that even a small incident can spark a chain of events that could be disastrous. And that’s exactly why Powell is here.

POWELL: We want to find out ways to de escalate militarily, de escalate some of the political and diplomatic steps that have been taken in recent weeks.

MITCHELL: What will he propose? When he arrives in India tomorrow night he will ask India to reverse its decision to close the border, and lift restrictions on Pakistani flights over its territory, if these first steps work then possibly a troop pullback. But here is the problem Powell faces: India still wants satisfaction for a suicide bomb attack on its Parliament, India claims staged by Pakistani terrorists. Powell, who has been working both sides hard with almost daily phone calls, got a major concession last week from Pakistan’s President Musharraf. On Saturday, he declared war on his country’s terrorists.

PERVEZ MUSHARRAF, PAKISTANI PRESIDENT: Pakistan will not allow its territory to be used for any terrorist activity anywhere in the world.

MITCHELL: As of tonight, he has arrested almost 2,000 militants, outlawed radical Islamic groups, cracked down on religious schools that recruit young boys into the terrorist ranks.

But it is a high-risk strategy. Pakistan’s leader faces challenges from Taliban supporters in his own government.

(on camera): To help prop him up, tonight Powell invited Musharraf to visit President Bush for the first time in Washington. But that gesture will surely infuriate India, creating even more challenges when Powell lands there tomorrow night.

Andrea Mitchell, NBC News, Islamabad. (END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: More on this: Along India’s border with Pakistan tonight, tension remain high, the outbreak of war still a very real threat.

NBC News correspondent George Lewis has that angle of the story tonight from Kashmir. (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GEORGE LEWIS, NBC CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Every day, at the only border gate between India and Pakistan, a ritual symbolizing the armed face-off between the two nations. Indian and Pakistani soldiers meet at sundown to lower their respective flags, with crowds of angry demonstrators on both sides shouting epithets.

CROWD: Pakistan!

CROWD: India!

CROWD: Pakistan!

CROWD: India!

LEWIS: The tension between India and Pakistan has spurred the biggest military buildup in 15 years. Why? They’re fighting over the divided state of Kashmir, framed by the Himalayas, a beautiful place with an ugly history of armed conflict. It’s been the scene of two wars and constant hostilities; 35,000 have died.

And now the armies are on full alert once again. The military buildup intrudes on the serenity of nature. India, mostly Hindu, occupies 45 percent of heavily Muslim Kashmir. Pakistan, also Muslim, has about a third of the territory, and China the rest. The U.N. called for free elections so the Kashmiris could choose whether they wanted independence. But those elections have never been held because India blocks them.

Now thousands of refugees run from border areas, as Muslim separatists operating from Pakistan attack the Indian side. These border villagers show off the bullet holes in their buildings and the scars on their own bodies.

(on camera): The people here have turned quite militant. They say they’re fed up with the Pakistanis using their village for target practice. But a war is about the only way to get rid of the problem.

(voice-over): The mood is also ugly in this Hindu refugee camp.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want only war.

LEWIS (on camera): You want only war.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes, we want only war. War is the solution.

LEWIS: War is the solution?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes.

LEWIS (voice-over): Back at the border crossing, the soldiers end their ceremony by slamming the gates closed, even as Colin Powell and other diplomats try to keep the doors open to negotiations aimed at averting war.

George Lewis, NBC News, Kashmir. (END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: When we come back here tonight, the collapse of Enron: The auditor who ordered documents destroyed is now helping investigators, but how much? And “@Issue” tonight: What about the executives who cashed in and left so many employees wiped out? Should they have to pay for it? (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: Readers of a lot of major daily newspapers in this country woke up this morning to find a full-page ad from Andersen Accounting. The ads are part of the big-five accounting firm’s efforts to prevent its role in the collapse of energy giant Enron from leading to its own collapse. But that’s possible.

We get the latest on the investigation into Andersen and the latest on Enron from NBC News correspondent Lisa Myers. (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

LISA MYERS, NBC CHIEF CONGRESSIONAL CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Today, the auditor who repeatedly certified Enron’s false financial reports, David Duncan, is grilled for more than four hours by congressional investigators, that as his former company, the Andersen accounting firm, places full-page newspaper ads to try to contain the damage.

The ads admit an error in judgment in the Enron case, say Duncan has been fired, and promised Andersen will do what is right.

JOSEPH DIGENOVA, FORMER FEDERAL PROSECUTOR: Arthur Andersen is doing the only thing it can do right now, given its position, which is a very bad position to be in.

MYERS: Late today, more trouble for the firm: Congressional investigators uncover a new memo, which they say shows the Enron whistle-blower who alerted Enron management to potential accounting scandals also called an Andersen partner in August, who immediately relayed her concerns to senior management.

So far, Andersen’s explanation is that it didn’t know all the facts about Enron. It has blamed David Duncan for what wrongdoing it admits, shredding of thousands of documents. But another new document, a report from Enron’s law firm, Vinson & Elkins, suggests Andersen headquarters knew plenty. The law firm wrote in October that all material facts about controversial partnerships used to hide Enron debt were disclosed and reviewed by Arthur Andersen and that experts at the Chicago headquarters were consulted.

DIGENOVA: The memo from Vinson & Elkins is damaging, severely damaging to Arthur Andersen, because it would undercut their argument that Mr. Duncan was acting as a rogue partner.

MYERS: Andersen earned $1 million a week serving as both Enron’s auditor and consultant, what critics say was a conflict of interests. Now Andersen is fighting for its own survival, facing huge potential claims by Enron investors and, experts say, a potential co-conspirator in a criminal case against Enron.

A former top securities regulator says the company could be in big trouble.

LYNN TURNER, CENTER FOR QUALITY FINANCIAL REPORTING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY: I think we’re going to turn around and find that Andersen, to some degree, is going to be found culpable in this situation.

MYERS (on camera): Tonight, Andersen is not commenting. Duncan’s lawyer insists he’s done nothing wrong. Congressional investigators say Duncan is cooperating and providing valuable information.

Lisa Myers, NBC News, the Capitol. (END VIDEOTAPE)

WILLIAMS: Perhaps no one has been hurt in the Enron collapse as much as the company’s employees, including many who lost everything, their life savings gone. “@Issue” tonight: Will Enron’s demise turn out to be a crime without punishment? Should the U.S. have tougher laws to protect investors? Or should Enron’s investors and employee have done a better job watching their own interests?

For more, we are joined now from New York by documentary filmmaker and author Michael Moore, best known as the writer, director and star of “Roger and Me,” the story of the General Motors chairman and his hometown of Flint, Michigan. He is also the author, we should point out, of a new book, “Stupid White Men.” And it comes out next month.

Also with us from New York tonight: James Glassman, investment columnist for “The Washington Post,” a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and author of a new investment guide, “The Secret Code of the Superior Investor: How to be a Long-Term Winner in a Short-Term World.”

Gentlemen, welcome to you both.

And, Michael, I would like to begin with you. For all those of us who have worked for what we have today, this enrages people to read about, to hear about. However, investing in stock, even in a retirement plan, is not a passbook saving account. It is for serious-minded adults who know what they’re doing and know how to assume risk. What, in your mind, should come out of this?

MICHAEL MOORE, AUTHOR, “STUPID WHITE MEN”: Well, somebody should go to jail.

I mean, this company, Brian, these executives, they knew things were going south, and they went and they took this money for themselves, knowing that all the workers at this company were going to be left with nothing. And I just can’t believe that—I mean, there are people in prison right now in California for stealing a slice of pizza, and they’re in there for life. And the fact—to think that these guys could even get away with this.

And the connections, I don’t want to—let’s not forget the connections here, because too many people right now are saying, well, the Bush administration, they didn’t do anything wrong. Evans and O’Neill have come out and said: Well, they called us and we didn’t do anything to help them.

Well, what about their silence? If they got a call from Enron for help back in the summer and in the fall, and they didn’t tell anybody or didn’t do anything, I mean, that right there makes them complicit in this crime. And, if I could just take a second, Brian, let’s just break it down. Who is Paul O’Neill, our treasury secretary? He is the former CEO of Alcoa, the third largest contributor to the Bush campaign—Enron, the No. 1 contributor to the Bush campaign.

Who is the lawyer—who is the law firm for Alcoa? Vinson & Elkins. Who is the law firm for Enron? Vinson & Elkins. Don Evans, who got the other call from Enron, our commerce secretary, who is he? He’s the former chairman of Tom Brown Inc., an oil and gas company worth $1.2 billion. He was also the finance chairman of the Bush campaign that collected the money from Enron and Alcoa. They’re all connected in this. Let’s not forget this.

WILLIAMS: There are a lot of ties here.

James Glassman, is it two separate issues? Some bad guys probably did some very bad things. And some people probably will see life inside a cell before this is all over. What to do about the risk that people assumed and the losses that regular people who woke up in the morning, went to work and came home, are now suffering?

JAMES GLASSMAN, “THE WASHINGTON POST”: Right.

As far as the executives of this company are concerned, they obviously will be investigated. There could be fraud charges. There could be insider-trading charges. Charles Keating got 150 months sentence in prison. The Cendant executives are now under indictment. This is what happens in this country. And it’s the right thing.

Now, what happens to the employees? They have suffered, certainly, because many of them owned big chunks of stock in their own companies. The company stock was in fact given to the employees as a matching donation for their 401(k) plans. It mounted up so that it was far too big a chunk to have in a retirement account for any one stock. The question is: Whose responsibility is that?

And I would say that it’s very important for employees, for people who are watching this show today, to understand that they have responsibility themselves for their own retirement plans. That’s what they should do.

WILLIAMS: But what about the employees who wanted to dump out, wanted to cash out?

GLASSMAN: OK.

The way that the Enron retirement plan worked, which is quite similar to the retirement plan of most large companies, is that, if you bought the Enron stock yourself for the part of the retirement plan where you made your own contributions…

WILLIAMS: Discretionary, right.

GLASSMAN: Right. It was discretionary. You could move that any time you wanted. You could take it and put it into Fidelity Magellan or into bonds or whatever you wanted.

However, the part that Enron gave you as a matching grant, you could not move until you were 50 years old. After that, you could move it as much as you wanted. Then there was one period lasting two weeks, or 10 trading days, when there was a freeze because there was a change in an administrator. Now, that ought to be investigated. There might be some hanky-panky. However, the stock at that point was already down to $14. It went to $10. So that probably didn’t hurt too many people, that particular freeze.

WILLIAMS: Michael Moore, back up to one of your points. Not many people will give you an argument: This ship was sinking. They knew it on the bridge. They didn’t tell the people in the engine room.

To your point, seventh largest company in the country is sinking—if I read you correctly, they’re damned if they do, damned if they don’t. If they called the White House and somebody had raised their hand and said, “Look, I just got a call from Enron and they’re failing,” that would have been a problem because it would have showed collusion. You’re saying that it was bad that no one did raise their hand and say, “Look, I got a call from the seventh largest company in the country and they’re failing.”

MOORE: Right.

They got a call. They knew they were failing. And they probably also knew that the executives were forming these 3,000 partnerships, sending all this money offshore. You know, they had to have known that this was going on. And that’s when they, our elected officials, the people in Bush’s Cabinet, should have done something to protect these employees.

But, to answer your question…

WILLIAMS: Does that mean government, Michael? Does that mean new safeguards for people who buy stocks, 401(k)s?

MOORE: Oh, yes, absolutely.

And, Brian, here’s the irony of this. Enron and Kenneth Lay, its chairman, Lay had his own little—almost little corner office in the White House in the early days of the Bush administration, because, if you wanted a job in the Energy Department or the regulatory commissions, you had to be interviewed first by Kenneth Lay.

GLASSMAN: That’s complete nonsense.

(CROSSTALK)

MOORE: May 25, “New York Times,” it’s right there.

WILLIAMS: Go ahead, James.

GLASSMAN: He didn’t vet every energy employee.

Let me tell you something about Enron. The single most important issue for Enron—and “The Washington Post” recently reported this—as far as their trading income was concerned, would have been the passage of the Kyoto agreement. Ken Lay lobbied both administrations very hard, especially the Bush administration, and didn’t get what he wanted. So the Bush administration was not a wholly-owned subsidiary of Enron or anything close to that.

Second, it is completely untrue that people at the White House knew that there were all sorts of these, what are called special-purpose entities that were set up by Enron to take some of its debt off the books. That’s the issue.

MOORE: Nobody in America believes that, James—I’ve got to tell you something—because Kenneth Lay was a good friend of George Bush’s.

GLASSMAN: Oh, so he was telling him all about how their books were set up?

MOORE: The Enron jets flew Bush around the country during his campaign in 2000. The Enron jets flew him during the primaries.

GLASSMAN: Michael, if he was such a good friend of Bush’s, why didn’t he bail the company out, as Ken Lay requested?

(CROSSTALK)

MOORE: Because it was so far gone at that point. Believe me, these people who hate the federal government—”Oh, we want less regulation. We don’t want control. We want to be left alone, free enterprise”—as soon as they start to go under, whether it’s Ken Lay or the airlines or whatever, they go running to the federal government for their welfare.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: We are officially calling time here in New York.

Gentlemen, thank you both very much. We’ll do this again. I see an hour on Enron in our future.

Michael, we’ll have you back when “Stupid White Men” comes out, because, after all, we all can name many.

Thank you both, gentlemen.

Financial troubles at Kmart are worsening tonight. Shares of the company sank almost 35 percent to $1.60 a share. It was dropped from the S&P 500 index. Kmart officials announced a week ago that the company would, at best, break even in 2001. But this looks bad. Industry analysts are now speculating Kmart, the jewel of the one-time Kresge family, could file Chapter 11 and would be the biggest retail bankruptcy in history.

That, combined with other disappointing corporate profits and earnings forecasts on Wall Street, helped push down markets, both of them, considerably today. The Dow was off by more than 211 points to close at 9712. Nasdaq lost 56 to finish at 1944.

We’ll be back with more right after this. (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: We are back with a look at the morning newspapers.

Let’s begin with overseas, really, with “The International Herald Tribune,” but an issue of great interest, of course, to travelers all over the world, especially those in a certain set that can pay a lot to fly much faster across the Atlantic. The official report from the French government is out now on the Air France Concord crash. That was July of 2000, you’ll recall.

It confirms what a lot of people have long suspected. Debris on the runway—and they’re saying from a Continental Airlines jet that took off prior—caused this crash. The report criticizes maintenance procedures of both Air France and Continental. Continental, by the way—and as you might expect—is saying good luck proving that that piece of metal in question came from specifically a Continental aircraft. But it’s believed it was somehow ingested. And you’ll also recall the Concords have been all retrofitted with different tires, bladders, engine parts to prevent that particular mishap from happening again.

“Washington Post”: Health reports indicate that, for the Hart Senate Office Building, the second time was the charm, meaning the injection of a kind of poisonous gas. They tried once. They tried twice. The Hart Senate Office Building, which is home to about roughly half of the U.S. Senate, is now being declared ready for occupancy after two tries at detox after the anthrax scare. That was where the first major scare was on Capitol Hill.

“L.A. Times” reporting three former member of the SLA, the Symbionese Liberation Army, best known for their abduction and the alleged mind-washing of Patricia Hearst, the young heiress, three members of the SLA have been arrested in connection with a fatal bank heist that was 27 years ago. In 1975 in April, a man died during the commission of that bank robbery.

And “USA Today” is reporting the Charlotte Hornets basketball team could be moving to New Orleans. The Hornets have been trying to get a better deal out of the city of Charlotte and get a new arena out of it. It looks like they may take their act on the road. It will all be announced, apparently, on a radio show tomorrow.

We’re going to take a break and come back with a mind-bending mistake out of the state of Florida. (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: The good folks in Lauderhill, Florida came very close to making a grievous error. On Saturday, they are all set to honor Shakespearian-trained actor James Earl Jones. The problem: The plaque they commissioned to present to the actor is made out instead to the man who shot and killed Dr. Martin Luther King, James Earl Ray. Further, the plaque really lays it on, thanking the assassin for—quote—”keeping the dream alive.”

The Texas company that made the plaque is promising a new one by Saturday’s festivities. That would be good. In one of the best understatements of this still young year, 2002, they have called it a copy error. Let’s go ahead and join them in honoring James Earl Jones this coming Saturday.

That’s it for us tonight. Coming up next on MSNBC: the broadcast “A REGION IN CONFLICT WITH ASHLEIGH BANFIELD”—substituting tonight, Forrest Sawyer, live from the Philippines.

That is our broadcast for this Wednesday evening. I’m Brian Williams, NBC News. Thank you for being with us. We’ll look for you right back here tomorrow evening. Good night, everyone.

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Law school student goes on a fatal shooting spree, killing three and wounding three


NBC Nightly News (6:30 PM ET) - NBC

TOM BROKAW, anchor:

Tonight, authorities in rural Virginia say a man who went on a fatal shooting spree at a law school was a student who was not making the grade. The school is in Grundy, Virginia, 120 miles west of Roanoke. It was new and working to make a name for itself, but not like this. Here’s NBC’s Kevin Tibbles.

KEVIN TIBBLES reporting:

Shots rang out at 1 this afternoon on the campus of the tiny Appalachian School of Law. By the time the shooter was overpowered, three people were dead, three others wounded. Police say the 43-year-old suspect is a student from Nigeria who failed last year and who was suspended from school this morning.

Unidentified Man: He was kind of a loner, and it was hard to approach him. He was very closed off.

TIBBLES: The shots fired execution style, according to police, from a semi-automatic handgun. The dead include the dean of the law school, L. Anthony Sutin, a former member of the Clinton administration’s Justice Department. The father of two young children, former law partners say he had a huge heart. One faculty member and a student were also shot dead. The three injured students rushed to nearby hospitals.

State police in Virginia are crediting law students at Appalachian for preventing further loss of life, saying they overpowered the gunman and held him until police could arrive.

Professor PAUL LUND (Associate Dean): The ASL community is profoundly shocked and saddened by this tragedy. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family and friends of the victims.

TIBBLES: The Appalachian School of Law opened in 1997 to encourage young people in this traditional coal mining region to study and practice law. It is housed on the campus of a former junior high school and boasts just 170 students and 15 faculty. A trauma unit has now been set up on the tiny campus to counsel those who have lost friends. A memorial service will be held at the school tomorrow. Kevin Tibbles, NBC News, Chicago.

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Widening the War;

Anchor: Jim Lehrer
The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

JIM LEHRER: Good evening. I’m Jim Lehrer. On the NewsHour tonight: A summary of today’s news; an interview with the Philippine ambassador about his country’s U.S.-assisted war against terrorists; a look at today’s Supreme Court arguments about managed care health plans; a report on rebuilding the section of the Pentagon damaged in the 9/11 attacks; and a shape of the world conversation with Trudy Rubin of the “Philadelphia Inquirer.”

NEWS SUMMARY

JIM LEHRER: A federal grand jury returned a new indictment today against the alleged shoe bomber. Richard Reid was charged with attempted murder and seven other crimes. The British citizen allegedly tried to light explosives in his sneakers on a flight from Paris to Miami last month. Fellow passengers subdued him and the plane landed in Boston. Today, Attorney General Ashcroft said it was clear Reid had received training from al-Qaida.

JOHN ASHCROFT: Reid’s indictment alerts us to a clear, unmistakable threat that al-Qaida could attack the United States again. The lessons for Americans are undeniable. We must be prepared, we must be alert, we must be vigilant. Al-Qaida trained terrorists may act on their own, or as part of the terrorist network but we must assume that they will act.

JIM LEHRER: Reid could get life in prison if he’s convicted. He remains jailed outside Boston. An Algerian man was sentenced today to 24 years in prison in a failed bomb plot. It involved a plan to explode a suitcase bomb at Los Angeles international airport around January 1, 2000. The man sentenced in New York supplied cash and fake ID’s to the plotters. Police foiled the scheme when they arrested another Algerian in Washington State in December, 1999. He trained at Osama bin Laden’s camps in Afghanistan. The U.S. Military has increased its presence in the Philippines to fight terrorism. Defense Secretary Rumsfeld said today more than 200 U.S. troops are already there. He said several hundred more would follow. They’ll train and support Philippine soldiers battling Muslim guerrillas. The rebels currently hold two Americans and a Filipino hostage. We’ll have more on this story in a few minutes. In Afghanistan today, U.S. Intelligence officers questioned a man who walked into the Marine base at Kandahar yesterday. He claimed to have information on the finances of the Taliban and al-Qaida. In Washington, Secretary Rumsfeld said finding Osama bin Laden and the Taliban leader, Mullah Omar, remains a challenge.

DONALD RUMSFELD: Lots of information is coming in, how could I say, answer to that any specific information. It’s all specific, most of it’s wrong! But it’s all specific. It is… What we’re trying to know is where somebody is and we don’t know precisely where he is. We have a good sense in the country… We still believe they’re in the country; we’re still working on that basis, although we are looking some other places as well from time to time.

JIM LEHRER: In other developments, a third planeload of Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners arrived at the U.S. Naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. A fourth plane left Afghanistan. The general overseeing the operation in Guantanamo said some of the prisoners have vowed to kill an American there if they can. And in Pakistan, searchers found the remains of the last of seven U.S. Marines. They were killed in a plane crash last week. A gunman killed three people today at the Appalachian School of Law in the southwestern Virginia town of Grundy. The dead included the dean of the school, a professor and a student. Three students were critically wounded; the suspect was captured. A doctor at the scene said he was a student upset about his grades. The former lead auditor of Enron’s books met with House investigators today in Washington. His lawyers said David Duncan was cooperating with the congressional inquiry. The Arthur Andersen accounting firm fired him yesterday. It said he organized the destruction of records last October. That was after the Securities and Exchange Commission asked Enron for accounting information. There was more financial fallout from Enron’s collapse today. The banking firm J.P. Morgan Chase said it lost more than $300 million in the fourth quarter of last year. It blamed bad loans to Enron and Argentina. On Wall Street today, the J.P. Morgan losses and a technology sell-off pushed stocks lower. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 211 points, or 2%, to close at 9,712. The NASDAQ Index dropped 56 points to close at 1944, a loss of 2.8%. In other economic news, the Labor Department reported consumer prices fell last month by 0.2%. For the year, they rose just 1.6%, due mostly to the largest drop in energy costs since 1986. And the Federal Reserve said industrial production fell 3.9% last year. It was the first yearly decline since 1991. The U.S. Supreme Court will decide if states can force outside reviews of HMO decisions. Today, it heard the case of an Illinois woman with a rare nerve condition. After an independent review, her insurance company had to reimburse her for corrective surgery. 40 states allow such reviews, and, in most cases, the conclusions are binding. The HMOS want a single, national standard. The airlines will meet a deadline Friday for screening all checked bags for explosives. Transportation Secretary Mineta confirmed that today. Initially, he had voiced doubt the industry could be ready as early as Congress wanted. But in a Washington speech today, he said airlines and airports would be ready.

NORMAN MINETA, Secretary of Transportation: In working with the airlines, we have taken the necessary action to meet this requirement. Every available explosive detection system, EDS machine, will be used to its maximum capacity. Where we do not yet have EDS resources in place, we’ll use other options outlined in the law.

JIM LEHRER: And those other options include matching bags to passengers, using bomb- sniffing dogs and increasing hand-searches by security officers. Three former members of the Symbionese Liberation Army were arrested today in California and Oregon, they face murder charges in a bank robbery in California in 1975. Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst took part. The radical group had kidnapped her a year earlier. She served two years in prison for a later bank job before President Carter commuted her sentence.

FOCUS - WIDENING THE WAR

JIM LEHRER: Now some details on the Philippines story - the opening of another front in the war on terrorism. We start with some background from Spencer Michels.

SPENCER MICHELS: Since last fall, a small number of American military advisors or “consultants” has joined the Philippine Army in its fight against Muslim Separatists linked to al-Qaida. Until now, the details of their mission have been kept secret.

REPORTER: How do you find the Philippines army so far?

SOLDIER: No comment.

REPORTER: What can you say?

SOLDIER: I can’t comment.

SPENCER MICHELS: Today Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld announced that the American mission to the Philippines—a former U.S. colony– will expand soon. Within a month, the U.S. contingent will number around 600, including 150 Navy Seals, Army Green Berets, Marines and Special Forces.

At the Pentagon, Rumsfeld used the words “training exercises” to describe the mission.

SEC. DONALD RUMSFELD: I believe, the last time I looked, something like 240 or 250 Americans, military personnel, in the country. They are located in several locations in the country. More are going in. They are there for training purposes, they are there for logistics purposes, they are there for an exercise with the Philippine government. As you know, we have a very long military-to-military relationship between the United States and the Philippines. And I expect that there will be several hundred more people going in.

SPENCER MICHELS: The American forces will help train more than a thousand Filipino soldiers in their fight against Muslim extremists.

The targeted group is Abu Sayyef—one of several armed Islamic groups in the largely Catholic country.

Based in the southern islands of Basilan and Jolo, Abu Sayyef has kidnapped foreigners for ransom, often killing them in grisly fashion.

Last year’s victims included American Guillermo Sobero. Two other American missionaries from Kansas, Martin and Gracia Burnham, have been held since last May.

Investigators believe Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida helped fund Abu Sayyef in the early 1990s, and said bin Laden’s brother-in-law met directly with the group.

There’s also a Philippine connection to Ramzi Yousef, the man linked to al-Qaida and convicted of plotting and participating in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center.

Yousef once lived in this Manila apartment. In a 1995 raid, Philippine authorities found evidence of al-Qaida plans to crash a jet into the CIA headquarters, blow up several American airliners, and assassinate the Pope.

At the Pentagon, Secretary Rumsfeld was asked if Abu Sayyef was involved in September 11th.

SEC. DONALD RUMSFELD: There is no question that there have been linkages between al-Qaida and activities that have taken place in the Philippines. And second, the United States is clearly interested in al-Qaida. We are interested in a lot more than al-Qaida.

REPORTER: If I could follow—all the documents, the cell phones, the laptops, the evidence that you’ve gathered—does any of that directly point to the involvement of Abu Sayyaf in the September 11th attacks? Does any of that support that at all?

SEC. DONALD RUMSFELD: I’m not in a position to respond. I don’t—and I don’t know that I would want to if I happened to have gone through and reviewed all of that material.

SPENCER MICHELS: Concern about terrorism in the Philippines is part of the administration’s worry about Islamic militancy throughout the region.

Last month Malaysian officials arrested 13 radical Muslims. They say the men contacted Zacharias Moussaoui, the alleged 20th hijacker, in September or October. Singapore has arrested 13 men as well, saying eight trained in al-Qaida camps. The Singapore government also released this alleged al-Qaida videotape. It shows a train station believed to be one of the group’s targets. Western embassies and American companies in Singapore were also on the list.

And in Indonesia, the government believes al-Qaida funded a terrorist training camp used by local Muslim militants.

To help fund the new Philippine mission, President Bush in November committed $100 million in military aid to the government of President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo. But Arroyo told the NewsHour last November she did not ask for ground troops. Foreign combatants are both unpopular and banned in the Philippines.

JIM LEHRER: You do not want the United States to send armed troops in there to help your army get rid of these people?

PRESIDENT GLORIA ARROYO, Philippines: (November 19, 2001) Well, I think our… I think that our armed forces are quite good in what they’re doing. So what we really need would be really a technical assistance and equipment, materials, joint planning.

SPENCER MICHELS: Defense Secretary Rumsfeld said the Philippine training exercises are scheduled to last six months.

JIM LEHRER: And with us now is the Philippine Ambassador to the United States, Albert del Rosario.

Mr. Ambassador, welcome.

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Thank you. Thank you, Jim.

JIM LEHRER: Have things changed since I had that interview with your president in terms of the situation on the ground in the Philippines and the need for U.S. assistance, military assistance?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, basically, Jim, what’s happened is that the - Abu Sayyef, which has been operating in about one or two of the seven thousand islands has—have been very elusive. And although the numbers of the group have been reduced from an estimated 1,200 to what is now purportedly at less than 100, we’re talking about the core group now. The terrain and the dense forest have made the capture and the eradication of this group very difficult. And to cover this last mile, the Philippines has invited the United States to provide help in terms of technical assistance, in terms of advice, and in terms of training.

JIM LEHRER: Now many Americans are viewing this as a new step in the U.S. war against terrorism. How do the Philippines see what’s going on with the introduction of more U.S. troops?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, I think we are grateful for the assistance from the United States. But I think the public should not view the Philippines as being in the category of some of the other countries being mentioned. We are not harboring terrorism; we are fighting terrorism, Jim.

JIM LEHRER: And the U.S. troops, there’s a lot of terms that can be misused or misunderstood in this case, they are there to train and Secretary Rumsfeld as we just heard, to provide logistics, but they’re also combat soldiers, are they not? They’re going to be armed and if something happens they can shoot back, is that correct?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, the presence of U.S. troops in the Philippines is not for combat purposes. They are supposed to observe and assist, and in the process of doing that yes they are armed and they may defend themselves if so attacked.

JIM LEHRER: This is a sensitive issue in the Philippines, is it’s not, having foreign troops, particularly from the United States on the ground?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: I think, Jim, that there is clearly a legal framework in terms of the mutual defense treaty and the visiting forces agreement, that appropriately covers this activity.

JIM LEHRER: But in terms of the politics of the Philippines, I read some things today that some people say this is a violation of Philippines sovereignty, violation of the constitution; the U.S. soldiers should not come. I mean how do you read that sort of thing?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, I think it’s a matter of education. The U.S. troops are there for essentially three missions. One is to provide assistance, training and advice

In terms of pursuing the Abu Sayyaf. The second is to be able to train this one or two light reaction companies in addition to that which has already been trained earlier. And of course the third is to be able to conduct the joint military exercises under the visiting forces agreement that is actually a yearly occurrence.

JIM LEHRER: Now, Abu Sayyaf, you say there are only about 100 of them left still at large. Tell us about them. Who are these people, where do they come from, what do they believe in?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, the Abu Sayyaf are a, this is a splinter group of a much larger group which advocates the establishment of an independent Muslim state. The main group now is under a peace process, and this splinter group actually was formed by a former trainee of bin Laden from Afghanistan. And when he came back from Afghanistan in 1990, he started this group, and they started by their wave of terrorism by bombing churches and Christian groups. And then they went on to accelerate these terrorist activities in terms of engaging in kidnap for ransom activities. Subsequently, after this was founded by this person, Janjalani was his name, –

JIM LEHRER: Janjalani.

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Yes—there was also a fellow called Kalifa, who happened to be the brother-in-law of bin Laden who came to the Philippines to start several foundations, purportedly for funding terrorism activity in the Philippines. Now, he was shut down in—his organizations were shut down by the government in 1995—1995 I think it was. And after that, later on a few years later Janjalani was killed in a firefight. So there is documented evidence, Jim, that there is a historical link dating back to 1990 that this group is affiliated with the al-Qaida group. But after 1995, it becomes rather hazy and circumstantial in terms of that link. Although in—sometime last year—late last year there was a bombing in Suwbwanga, and the perpetrator who was caught, a fellow called Marvin Gjonson, I believe, he was related to the Abu Sayyaf, and there were documentation found in his person that seem to link him to the al-Qaida groups. So there you are.

JIM LEHRER: Okay. Why is it so hard to find these 100 people? What is it that the U.S. Military, what kind of expertise can they bring to this manhunt that has now been going on for several years now already in the Philippines?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Well, I think, as I mentioned earlier, Jim, the terrain is very difficult.

JIM LEHRER: Describe the terrain. What kind of terrain?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: I’ve not been there, but I’m told, and there’s documentary evidence from the U.S. Military itself that the terrain is difficult because you have mountains and you have dense jungle, and you have very heavy fog in that area. So I think looking for a band of less than 100 would be like looking for a needle in a haystack. Now, in terms of intelligence, I think the Philippine forces have human intelligence, but it’s not real time, for example.

JIM LEHRER: You find out something two weeks too late you mean?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: That’s right. Before that human intelligence gets its information back, and before the Philippine troops can mobilize and get transported to that area where the Abu Sayyaf may have been viewed, it’s too late, they are not there any more. So what we’re looking for from the United States is equipment, real-time intelligence.

JIM LEHRER: Technology as well?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Yes, yes. And the objective, I think I might add, of this joint training is, it gives the U.S. Military exposure in terms of working in terrain like that, and the exchanges that the Philippine forces are able to train in terms of using modern equipment.

JIM LEHRER: Is there any word at all, new word at all on the Burnhams, the two captured American missionaries who are being held for ransom?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: There are supposed to be sightings of the Burnhams, and they seem to be, they are physically weak, but they’re still moving around, they’re being moved around, and they are alive. And it is our prayer that the military and the cooperation between the Philippines and the United States will be able to safely rescue them, Jim.

JIM LEHRER: Mr. Ambassador, much is being made, as you saw in the newspapers this morning, about this new arrangement, in other words the decision to send more U.S. troops there. In the first place, is too much being made about this? Do you see, in the Philippines the introduction of the U.S. troops, as many as 600, is this a big a deal there as it appears to be here for us because it relates directly to Afghanistan or appears to?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: I think the numbers would require some explanation. We do have a joint military exercise that is taking place at the same time as the pursuit of the Abu Sayyaf. Out of the 600 that you mentioned, only 100 or so are Special Forces. The other 500 are support and maintenance personnel, because they will also have aircraft and they will also have some other equipment there that need to be upgraded and maintained.

JIM LEHRER: As a practical matter, would this military arrangement have even happened if there hadn’t been September 11? I mean, would the Philippines have felt compelled in the atmosphere that existed before to ask the U.S. for this kind of help?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: I think that in the context of what happened on September 11, Jim, the terrorism per se is abominable, it is a scourge, and I think that the international coalition in pursuing the eradication of terrorism throughout the world is, was the September 11 was the catalyst for this.

JIM LEHRER: And an impetus that led to this?

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Yes, that’s correct.

JIM LEHRER: Mr. Ambassador, thank you very much.

ALBERT DEL ROSARIO: Thank you, Jim, I enjoyed being with you.

FOCUS - MANAGING CARE

JIM LEHRER: Still to come on the NewsHour tonight: Managed care before the U.S. Supreme Court, rebuilding the Pentagon, and Trudy Rubin of the “Philadelphia Inquirer.” Margaret Warner has the court story.

MARGARET WARNER: At issue before the Supreme Court today was whether a state, in this case Illinois, can force managed health care plans to abide by an independent review when there is a dispute with a patient. We get more on the case and today’s proceedings from the NewsHour’s regular court- watcher, Jan Crawford Greenburg of the “Chicago Tribune,” and Susan Dentzer of our health unit, a partnership with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All right, Jan, tell us about this case. Tell us about this Ms. Moran.

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Debra Moran was diagnosed in 1996 with a rare and very painful nerve condition in her right shoulder. At first she had trouble blow-drying her hair, but it progressed to the point where she couldn’t even pick up a fork without her husband helping her. She went to doctor after doctor, through her HMO plan, she saw orthopedists, rehab doctors, physical therapists, but nothing, she said, alleviated or helped the pain. It always would come back. So she heard about this specialist in Virginia, and the specialist was doing a more aggressive newer kind of surgery. And she explored that option. The specialist thought that Ms. Moran would be an ideal candidate for this kind of surgery. But the specialist was not in her HMO’s network. So Ms. Moran went back to her primary care physician who agreed that this surgery was medically necessary, recommended that she go ahead and have it. Her HMO, Rush Prudential, refused to pay for the cost and said no, you need to see our network surgeons, we’ll pay for that, it’s a less complicated and less expensive surgery, but we think that’s good enough and that’s medically necessary but the Rush affiliated surgeons were proposing a treatment that they said only carried with it about a one-third chance of success and also a one-third chance that something could go wrong, including possibly paralysis. Debra Moran obviously didn’t like those odds. So she decided to go ahead and pay for the surgery herself. She said she - you know—maxed out her credit cards, borrowed money from other sources and paid $95,000. Then she asked again –.

MARGARET WARNER: And was successful?

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Right. So she asked Rush again to pay for this, Rush declined. She went to state court to get a judge to order Rush to go through, which had been declining to do too, to go through this independent review process so that an outside physician could look at her case to see if she was right. And the state court ordered Rush to do that. The process began, the outside independent reviewing physician from Johns Hopkins Medical center agreed with Moran, and the specialist that the surgery was necessary. So Rush, the reviewer says you played for the claim. Then Rush changed its approach.

MARGARET WARNER: So this, I gather, went through, she’s now suing to get her money back, and the first court ruled –

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Right. Rush then changed its approach a bit and raised a different argument in federal court. Then it said, look, this state law is invalid, this independent reviewing process, that’s just invalid, we don’t have to pay for this procedure because a federal law, federal employee benefits law, supersedes or takes precedence over this state law. So we don’t have to go through this process at all. The federal district court agreed with Rush. But a federal court of appeals in Chicago disagreed and it sided with Ms. Moran and it said that the state law didn’t conflict, the state law was valid, Rush took that appeal, took that case to the Supreme Court and that’s how we got here today.

MARGARET WARNER: All right. Susan, tell us about this federal law, because we hear a lot about this, ERISA a very difficult acronym. What is this law?

SUSAN DENTZER: It’s the Employee Retirement Income Security Act. It was passed in 1974. And it was designed really because Congress wanted to encourage the provision primarily of pensions and other employee benefit plans. And it was worried that the states were nickeling and diming employers, who often operated in multiple states, with lots of independent state statutes that conflicted in many instances. So Congress said we need one overriding federal statute on employee benefits, therefore passed ERISA in 1974. Over time it’s come to also apply to other employee benefits other than pensions and retirement plans, like health insurance. The critical issue, as Jan says, in this case is do the provisions of ERISA, which apply to employee benefits, override state statutes that pertain to insurance and the regulation of health care? Traditionally the regulation of insurance and health care has been left to the states. However, ERISA itself also carves out some exceptions. So now the parties are arguing over whether ERISA should apply in this case or whether the state law governing insurance, which HMO products are, in most states, or whether it is regulation of health care, and therefore that that is also under the purview of the State of Illinois in this case.

MARGARET WARNER: And some 40 states have passed some kind of patient protection that provides for some kind of independent preview process?

SUSAN DENTZER: Exactly, 41 states now and the District of Columbia have provisions that allow for this independent review—as does Medicare, the federal benefits program for the elderly.

MARGARET WARNER: All right. So Jan, tell us about court today. I gather the lawyer for the HMO went first - what did he argue –

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Right. John Roberts represented the HMO and he said the state law is invalid because it conflicted with ERISA. I mean—obviously just the sound of it, I mean these cases - as Roberts said today—can be extremely complicated, but this case, he see, was a straight forward one. States cannot require HMO’s to abide by whatever decision an independent reviewer may make because that’s a different remedy for someone who may have a complaint about a denial of benefits. If you’ve got a complaint about your benefits being denied, you’ve got to look at ERISA. The federal law, that’s the only remedy, that is a different remedy, Roberts said, so therefore is out the door, it’s out the window, we’ve got to rely on ERISA.

MARGARET WARNER: Did any of the Justices give him a hard time?

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Well, several of the Justices seemed inclined to do so - Justice Souter, Justice O’Connor even and Justice Stevens, but they didn’t really give him much resistance. They suggested, Justice O’Connor for example at one point said, well, what about insurance, I mean as Susan said? Is this really a law about HMO or employee benefits, or is it about insurance? And of course that’s the point that the lawyer for Debra Moran tried to make when he stood up next.

MARGARET WARNER: So what happened?

JAN CRAWFORD GREENBURG: Well, his main argument is that this isn’t about employee benefits, we know that that’s the purview of ERISA. This is about insurance, this is a law regulating insurance, ERISA says, that’s one of these exceptions, ERISA says insurance, that’s the state’s business. There’s another Supreme Court case that suggests there may be exceptions to that. But his bottom line was that this is about insurance, and he said all Debra Moran ever saw in this case is the benefits she was entitled to, which - you know - he said saved her right arm—trying to make this to a very straight forward case like Roberts had done before. But at that point Justice Scalia - Antonin Scalia—jumped right in and really framed the issues and in this case and said, look, the question is who gets to decide if she is entitled to those benefits, or who gets to decide what are the benefits that she gets. So you know Moran says the states can decide. The states can set up these independent reviewing boards, Rush Prudential says no, we’ve got this federal law and that’s what’s supposed to govern here. So that’s really what it boiled down to. I think Justice Scalia offered some resistance to Ms. Moran’s lawyer, as did Justice Kennedy and even the chief justice to some degree, they seemed to suggest they were not willing to embrace this Illinois law, or by extension maybe some of the other 39, 40 laws.

MARGARET WARNER: And there is a lot at stake here, Susan.

SUSAN DENTZER: Absolutely. In fact, for all of these states that have passed these provisions, they view that as a very important protection against decisions being made that are not based on medical necessity, not really based on the medical evidence. Consumer advocates think that if the Court rules in favor of the plans on this, in effect it would void all of those, it could have the possibility depending on how expansive the ruling is that could void all of those state statutes and that’s very problematic. And even the health plan industry is conflicted on this, because it has embraced external review as a very important element that nudges people to looking truly at the issues of medical necessity, is a procedure really medically necessary -

MARGARET WARNER: Rather than going to court.

SUSAN DENTZER:—rather than going to court—but also understanding the true medical evidence that something works or doesn’t work. So there’s a lot at stake on all sides.

MARGARET WARNER: So if the Court rules in favor of Rush, then the only way to get in these independent reviews would be for Congress to have to do something?

SUSAN DENTZER: In effect probably, depending again on what the Court actually says. But in fact, that is a big issue at stake in the fight to pass a patients bill of rights. All of the provisions that have passed on the Hill have an external review provision in them with various differences. The health plans as an industry want a national external review provision, they want that very much, again as a protection against excessive litigation and also nudging towards the scientific practice of medicine. So whatever the Court says, in fact there could be at the end of this a legislative remedy that restores an external review process for all Americans, but at a federal level, and in fact getting at the very issue that ERISA was designed to attack, to have one overall national standard on that issue.

MARGARET WARNER: All right. Well, thank you Susan and Jan.

FOCUS - REBUILDING

JIM LEHRER: Now, rebuilding the Pentagon building after the 9/11 terrorism attack. Ray Suarez has that story. (Sirens)

RAY SUAREZ: When a hijacked jetliner sliced into the Pentagon on September 11, Lee Evey was sitting in his office supervising the completion of the first phase of a 20-year, $1.2 billion renovation of the Pentagon.

LEE EVEY, Pentagon Renovation Program Manager: We were about five days from completing that process—a process that had taken us about three years. We were moving people in, following right behind the completion of the construction, and we were about half finished.

RAY SUAREZ: When Evey got to the crash site, he found the plane had crashed diagonally through a part of both the new renovation and the old building. Fire fed by 10,000 gallons of jet fuel was just beginning to spread. Eventually it would damage two million square feet, almost a third of the building.

LEE EVEY: It just seemed like a box of puzzle parts that had been dumped on a table. There seemed to be no rhyme, nor reason, to it at all. The people we had in the building are accustomed to constructing buildings, are accustomed to building them, not disassembling them and taking them apart. We went out and we hired very, very quickly, overnight, some people who are experts in blast recovery. They had worked Mexico City, they had worked Oklahoma City, they had worked the earlier blast at the Twin Towers in New York, and got them on site as quickly as possible.

RAY SUAREZ: Chief among those hires was Alan Kilsheimer, a structural engineer with years of experience in blast recovery. He arrived on site the afternoon of the 11th and has been on the rebuilding job 18 hours a day since.

ALAN KILSHEIMER, Structural Engineer: They asked me to “a.,” design it, “b.,” be responsible to make sure it’s built the way we want it built. I told them we had three rules. One is there are no rules except for my rules, and that they had to keep all the people with paper and all the bureaucrats out of my face. And they did that. They’ve been… I’ve never seen anything like it. I couldn’t get away with this in downtown Washington on a private job. I have no rules.

RAY SUAREZ: Kilsheimer says his working motto is simple: “Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.” The reconstruction has brought together an odd couple, the blunt and irreverent Kilsheimer, and the clean-cut and buttoned down project manager for the Pentagon, Will Colston. The two have been working closely since September 11. Both say it’s a partnership that works.

RAY SUAREZ: He may have only been half joking, that he demanded up front that people not be waving pieces of paper in his face, and that instead they wave them in your face. (Laughs) That’s the stuff that comes cascading down on the…

WILL COLSTON, Project Manager: That’s funny. He’s throwing a ton of drawings on top of me, which is on paper, itself. But no, it’s absolutely right. I mean, one of the key things that I do as the project manager for the government is to try to put the contracting methods, to put the funding, to be able to put any of the resources needed in place to support Alan as well as the contractor, and the other people working on this job to get it done.

RAY SUAREZ: While the fires were still burning, the reconstruction team decided to rebuild the damaged building as quickly as possible. Their goal is to have office workers in at least the outermost section, the building’s public face, where the jet hit the building, by September 11 of this New Year.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: Construction people are… They were really upset by this, what happened. It was an attack on them and what they stand for, and they’re going to show these people that they can do whatever they want to us, but we’re going to recover, and we’re going to recover faster than anybody ever imagined.

RAY SUAREZ: The original Pentagon structure is actually five different structures, or wedges; each one a separate entity connected by expansion joints. Five concentric rings of offices connect the wedges. The plane plowed through three rings just to the right of an expansion joint, almost like the first cut in a wedding cake.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: If you looked at the photographs early on, you saw a vertical clean line. That was the expansion joint. So everything to the left didn’t collapse and everything to the right collapsed within an hour or two.

RAY SUAREZ: On that left side was wedge 2, part of the unrenovated original Pentagon with no sprinkler system and tons of asbestos. On the right side was the newly renovated wedge 1 with a brand new advanced sprinkler system.

LEE EVEY: That fire went nowhere in wedge 1. Now I did get a heck of a lot of water damage in wedge 1, as a result of that, but the fire went nowhere. Wedge 2, the fire just took off. The heat of the fire was so intense that it damaged the concrete, and it damaged it further than we had initially thought that it had. In some areas, the fire was intense enough that the windows had actually melted.

RAY SUAREZ: After the rescue and crime scene personnel left the site in mid-October, demolition crews flattened a 100-yard-wide section of the building. Working around the clock, crews removed 47,000 tons of debris, more than 5,000 dump truck loads. Instead of the usual six months, the demolition phase took just a month and a day. Then they immediately began pouring concrete, and they haven’t stopped since. Ground was broken for the Pentagon on September 11, 1941, as the United States was about to enter World War II. The building, all 29 acres of it, went up in just 16 months. It was built so fast, the architectural drawings were completed after the fact, creating any number of design headaches. Since the attack, Evey and Kilsheimer have continually explored the site and say they were continually surprised by what they found.

LEE EVEY: Pick a building code– the Pentagon doesn’t comply with it. Okay, we do not comply with a single building code.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: It was done differently in ‘41 than the very sketchy drawings we had showed, or it had been worked on over the years so that we, even today, are still finding things differently than we thought, and we have to keep adjusting what we’re doing to accommodate what we uncover.

RAY SUAREZ: For example:

ALAN KILSHEIMER: There are tunnels and things all in and around here that were done over the years, and we’re trying to work around all those things.

RAY SUAREZ: Now I’m going to guess that there was a lot of conduit, cable, communications lines that because this was a 1941 building, had to be run in sub-optimal places.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: Yes.

RAY SUAREZ: But now that you’re building from scratch, you have a chance to do it right?

ALAN KILSHEIMER: Yes.

RAY SUAREZ: And you had those wires…

ALAN KILSHEIMER: Yes, it will be done a lot better than it was done before.

RAY SUAREZ: The rebuilt part will also be tougher and more resistant to blast damage. In wedge 1, the newly renovated section of the Pentagon, interlocking steel-beam supports and blast resistant windows, interspersed with a Kevlar, or bulletproof-type cloth, had just been installed. Evey says they were well worth the cost.

LEE EVEY: They cost us about $10,000 a piece when you put all the stuff together: The steel, the Kevlar, the windows, etc.. When the time came for these windows to account for themselves, in less than a second, they, you know, worked extraordinarily well and we strongly believe helped reduce the loss of life and injury in the building.

RAY SUAREZ: Those target-hardened window systems are built in a way that’s totally unlike any normal replacement window at home.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: So these are actually built into the forms that we pour the concrete in. So when we take the forms off the wall, these frames will be in the wall, imbedded in the concrete, and then the windows, the blast windows, will attach to this.

RAY SUAREZ: So these are purpose- built, designed for this job.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: Yes. Absolutely.

RAY SUAREZ: Is that common?

ALAN KILSHEIMER: No.

RAY SUAREZ: No, I didn’t think so.

ALAN KILSHEIMER: There’s nothing common to this job.

RAY SUAREZ: There’s also nothing common about how the workers rebuilding the Pentagon feel about the job they’re doing. There’s pride in the punishing schedule, and the rapid progress.

JEFF WINCHESTER: It’s moving kind of fast. Yeah, normally other projects are a little laid back, but right now, because it’s the Pentagon, the boss is asking everybody to pitch in. All those that are not going to pitch in, we’re letting them go.

TONY ARAUJO: I feel a little privileged to be out here. One day when I’m older, I’m going to be able to tell my kids, “I was there,” you know. “I did the reconstruction of the Pentagon after the plane went through it.”

KEVIN REED: It’s important to everybody out here. I mean, everybody… We come in early and work late, and we’re trying to get this thing put back together as fast as possible, and everybody’s willing to do it. It’s like bin Laden can’t come over here and hurt this country, because we can put it back together.

RAY SUAREZ: Pentagon historians can’t tell their story without September 11, the groundbreaking in 1941; the attack in 2001; and, if this construction crew has its way, a return to work in a completed new ring on September 11, 2002.

SERIES - THE SHAPE OF THE WORLD

JIM LEHRER: Finally tonight, another New Year conversation about the United States in the world with American commentators on international affairs. Gwen Ifill has tonight’s.

GWEN IFILL: And joining me is Trudy Rubin, a foreign affairs columnist for the “Philadelphia Inquirer.” Welcome, Trudy. It’s nice to see you in person for a change.

TRUDY RUBIN, Philadelphia Inquirer: It’s very nice to be here.

GWEN IFILL: You have written in your columns that what separates pre-September 11 from post- September 11 is a new global or an old global reality that we just weren’t paying attention to before. Elaborate on that.

TRUDY RUBIN: 9-11 was really a wake-up call. We were living in a very happy 1990s la-la land, where I think we didn’t understand that being a superpower has costs as well as benefits. Everybody was familiar with the benefits you gain from trade– we were doing very well economically, no one could really challenge us abroad. But I think what most Americans didn’t realize was that being a sole superpower breeds resentments and it breeds more resentments if you handle it casually or arrogantly. And I think they also didn’t understand that in the kind of world we live in now where information and mobility are so easy to come by and where everyone can move without being tracked, that it was very easy for stateless groups or individuals to harm America and that a highly industrialized society is very vulnerable to low-tech threats.

GWEN IFILL: But clich s aside, you write that September 11 did not change everything.

TRUDY RUBIN: No. It didn’t change things as much as we think because I think a lot of the same issues that we were discussing without the same intensity before 9/11 still exist: For example, the whole question of multilateralism versus unilateralism. Certainly we went into Afghanistan virtually alone. We had an alliance and the Brits helped us militarily, but basically it was our show, yet there were still questions about multilateralism that resonate more strongly after 9/11. For example, if you have failed states like Afghanistan, who is supposed to pick up the pieces, and who is supposed to do the peacekeeping? If you have a situation in Afghanistan where the country could break down again, if the United States isn’t involved in strengthening multilateral organizations that can provide the wherewithal and the people and money for that, then it’s not going to get done.

GWEN IFILL: So are you saying that the unilateralism of the United States that this administration was accused of prior to September 11 will come back in a different form?

TRUDY RUBIN: I think it never really went away. For example, the issue of how to deal with Russia—it is true that we have a new alliance, an antiterrorist alliance, but the same questions still resonate. The U.S. Has unilaterally decided to pull out of the ABM Treaty, and the relationship with Russia is still uncertain. And that needs to be worked out. And the same issues about peacekeeping, about foreign aid that were on the back burner before 9/11 haven’t really emerged to the front burner, and I think they will because they’re relevant in dealing with the kind of failed states that breed terrorism.

GWEN IFILL: You talked a moment ago about what happens next, nation-building, peacekeeping, whatever you want to call it. But you also have written that in order to, that the United States can’t get into this war without planning to win it. What is winning in a war like this? How do you define that?

TRUDY RUBIN: Winning, I think is a word that is… Now needs to be redefined after the fighting is over in Afghanistan. Winning does not mean ending terrorism because terrorism is a phenomena that was with us before 9/11 and there will always be terrorists at some level. There will always be local conflicts that will breed terrorism. And it doesn’t mean that we will be able to wipe it out everywhere in the world, because local conflicts, whether it’s Etta in Spain for Basque separatism, or the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka, are going to be there. We can give advice, help cut off funds, we can share intelligence. But winning, in terms of Afghanistan, I think we have already done what I would think of as winning.

GWEN IFILL: Can the United States claim any kind of real victory if bin Laden has not been captured?

TRUDY RUBIN: Yes, and I think bin Laden probably will be captured because I think somebody will sell him out. I think that the elements that we have achieved which are extremely important, we have broken his charismatic glow. Bin Laden on al-Jazeera will not have the same impact. People see the fraudulence of his dreams of rebuilding an Islamic radical caliphate in the whole world. So we’ve struck a blow in this regard in discrediting radical Islamism. It won’t go away, but we have achieved something. Pakistan, crucial. General Musharaff made an incredibly courageous speech. He’s basically trying to do just what many Pakistanis had dreamt of and hoped, which is end the Talibanization of his society. These are real victories.

GWEN IFILL: Is it possible to replicate this kind of victory that has happened in Afghanistan—if that’s what it is—in Iraq? That’s the big debate.

TRUDY RUBIN: Right. You can’t just take the template and transfer it. There’s no northern alliance. There’s no southern alliance. The Iraqi National Congress once had a base in northern Iraq. President Clinton basically sold them out in 1996. They don’t have the fighting force on the ground. There are some Iraqi exiles in Iran. It’s not clear if they could come across to fight or if they’re still Islamists or have changed their tune. That’s one big difference. A second big difference is you have to convince Iraq’s neighbors and Iraqis themselves that we’re serious. We called on them to rise in 1991; we sold them out then, too. They rose and were smashed by Saddam. So you have a harder sell. In Afghanistan people believed we would fight to the end. In Iraq, you will have to convince people, and you will have to count on convincing them and have Iraqis rise.

GWEN IFILL: Another difficult part of this puzzle is what’s happening in the Israeli-Palestinian question. You have written that you’ve never seen it this bad. Is it because it is getting lost in the Afghanistan swirl, or is it its own intractable issue that the United States hasn’t figured out how to cope with?

TRUDY RUBIN: I don’t think it’s insoluble. At the moment, it seems intractable. Obviously, the U.S. attention was taken away from it, although with this horrible phase, even with new attention paid, it’s not so clear that you can move. One big plus: If we do go after Saddam Hussein and succeed, I think that might be the lever that could unleash a new peace process in Israel and with the Palestinians because if that threat were taken away, I think there would be a lot of changes in the Arab world. It would make it easier to deal with Israel and the Palestinians.

GWEN IFILL: But you’ve written that Yasser Arafat is a failed leader; “a tragic failed leader,” I think were your words. Is he the one we still have to deal with in order to work this through, in spite of that?

TRUDY RUBIN: At the moment, there is not an apparent alternative. After Arafat is either chaos or Hamas. If one wants to cultivate an alternative amongst Palestinians themselves, because they have to pick the new leadership, there are people on the Palestinian side who are very clear in the commitment to states no more final end to conflict. And Israel has to cultivate those people. But unfortunately leaders like Saren Asayba and Mustafa Bargudi have been arrested recently, although released after a few hours. Mustafa Bargudi, a prominent doctor heads medical relief committees, beaten up. This is not the way to deal with moderate leaders that might be the future.

GWEN IFILL: Finally, I do want to throw some of your words back at you and have you respond. You wrote at one point in October, “Perhaps these dark days will produce some positive legacy, shock some leaders into wiser behavior. It may only be a dream, but I can’t bear to wake up yet.” Have you awakened yet?

TRUDY RUBIN: I actually am hopeful to a certain extent about the Middle East after this, because I see the beginnings of debate. I am thrilled with what is happening in Pakistan. The debate in the United States, however, I don’t think has been engaged, yet because we do have to debate what kind of a superpower we want to be in the world, what we need and want to do beyond military, and how to reach out; better trade policies, more opening to third world trade, more aid. We can’t solve the world’s problems, but if we’re the sole superpower, we have to do more than provide weapons.

GWEN IFILL: Trudy Rubin, thank you very much for joining us.

TRUDY RUBIN: You’re very welcome.

JIM LEHRER: We’ll continue this series next week with Tom Friedman of the “New York Times.”

RECAP

JIM LEHRER: And again, the major developments of the day. A federal grand jury issued a new indictment against the alleged shoe bomber, Richard Reid. He was charged with attempted murder and seven other crimes. The U.S. Military said it has increased its presence in the Philippines to fight terrorism. And a gunman killed three people at the Appalachian School of Law in Southwestern Virginia. The school’s dean was among the dead. We’ll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. I’m Jim Lehrer. Thank you and good night.

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‘FAILING’ LAW STUDENT SHOOTS DEAD THREE COLLEGE STAFF

Hugh Dougherty
Press Association

Four students overpowered a gunman who went on a shooting spree at their US college tonight, killing three people in what a doctor described as “executions”.

The four students tackled the man while he was still armed with a .380 semi-automatic pistol and managed to hold him until police arrived at the Appalachian School of Law, in Grundy, Virginia.

He had already shot and killed three people, including the dean of the college and one of the professors, and left three other students critically injured.

The doctor who was the first medical worker on the scene told Fox News the dean of the school, Anthony Sutin, had been “executed” with shots to the head, and another member of staff had been shot in the back as he lay on the ground.

“It appears as though some of these shots were after one professor was down and they were shot at point blank range,” said Dr Jack Briggs.

“Two shots were shot into the dean in the head. It appears he was executed.

“It looked like a war zone. There were bodies everywhere.”

The two staff members were apparently shot in front of their secretaries before the gunman went on a spree in which he shot randomly at students.

The doctor said the gunman was a “foreign exchange student” and had been on the point of being told to leave the law school which has around 170 students and was founded in 1997.

“Four students tackled him and took him down,” said the doctor.

“They got him down and kept him for his police. I do not believe he had given up his weapon.

“This student was a foreign student who had had difficulty. He flunked out of school last year.

“He was given another chance, but this was the end of the first semester. I believe that the dean was about to tell him that he would have to leave.

“He took his anger out on the people who I think he thought were responsible for him leaving the school.”

The three students were described as being “critical” by Dr Briggs, and had been transferred by helicopter to hospitals near the small town, which is in a rural area of the Appalachian Mountains.

The doctor added: “The person who did the shooting was a patient of mine. I saw him about six months ago. He was complaining of stress.”

“He was a timebomb waiting to go off. There are lots of things that will come out in the trial that I think are probably pretty pertinent to his personality.”

The college was set up in 1997 to help the run-down coal mining area’s economy and Mr Sutin, a graduate of Harvard Law School, was made principal with a staff of just 15.

Dr Briggs paid tribute to the dean and said: “He was a real good guy.”

All three were female students at the college.

And CNN reported that the dead Dean had been the chief legal adviser toformer presidential candidate Al Gore’s failed bid for the White House in 2000.

He had also been an assistant US attorney-general in Washington before being appointed to the college.

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Attack shocks school alumni, student; Smyth countians knew Appalachian School of Law victims

Steven Mackey
Smyth County News & Messenger

Smyth Countians who are alumni or students at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy were still reeling Friday from this week’s attack by a gunman that left three people dead. Despite the tragedy, alumni Alan Stratton and Jeff Campbell and student Melissa Carrico said the school will thrive.

According to Grundy police, a 43-year-old Nigerian-born student, Peter Odighizuwa, shot and killed three people during a Wednesday rampage. Three people were wounded. The dead are L. Anthony “Tony” Sutin, the school’s dean; Thomas F. Blackwell, a professor; and Angela Denise Dales, a student.

Students tackled the accused gunmen to the ground and subdued him until police arrived. Prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty against Odighizuwa. Within a day’s time, a memorial service was held at a church near the school to honor the slain.

Smyth County resident Melissa Carrico is in her second year at the Appalachian School of Law. On Wednesday, she had left the school a short time before the shooting occurred. She learned of the tragedy after getting home. Earlier in the day, she was in the same building where the shootings took place.

She said she is “still in shock” over the incident. Classes had begun only a week earlier, Carrico said.

Carrico said she was flooded with calls of concern and support from family, friends and others in the community. The same close atmosphere is prevalent at school, where the student population is just over 300, she said. The school opened in 1997. It is the first and only law school in the coalfields region.

She said all other professors and faculty members had a friendly, open door policy. Additionally, the school includes a curriculum of conflict resolution and arbitration, “things most law schools don’t teach,” Carrico said.

Carrico attended Thursday’s memorial service. On Friday she said she was “emotionally and physically exhausted.” She was not ready to return to the school on Friday.

“The school will band together and the people will be strong,” she said. “The school will succeed.”

Marion attorney Alan Stratton (right) of Bland and Associates was in the school’s first graduating class. Heavily involved in school activities as a student and an alumnus, Stratton said he knew Sutin well. While at school, Stratton helped found the student chapter of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America. Sutin was the faculty advisor for the group. Stratton is also on the burgeoning alumni association with which Sutin was heavily involved.

Stratton said he had been to numerous dinners with Sutin and his wife, Margaret Lawton. Sutin and Lawton came to Grundy from Washington, D.C., where they worked in government jobs. Sutin was an assistant under then-Attorney General Janet Reno.

“He was just an incredibly good man,” Stratton said. “He was brilliant. He was an excellent teacher, and I would put him up against anyone for teaching. I never heard a negative thing about him.”

Stratton said Sutin helped bring the infant school to life, adding that Sutin will be irreplaceable.

Stratton knew of Blackwell but did not know him personally. Stratton said he worked with Dales when she was employed in student services. Sutton worked as a recruiter for the school, talking to potential students about coming to study in Grundy.

Stratton said the school was challenging. Out of a first class of 72, just 30-some students graduated. According to police reports, failing grades and an expulsion may have been the motive for Odighizuwa.

Stratton said, “It’s a real blow to the school, the town and all of Southwest Virginia.”

Saltville Councilman and attorney Jeff Campbell (left), who graduated with Stratton, said, “There is no doubt it is a big loss for the school. [Sutin] was just an outstanding administrator. I don’t know how you would ever replace him. The contacts the man had were outstanding.”

Campbell said he was still in a state of shock over the shooting. He said he is praying for the families involved in the shooting. Campbell had Sutin for two classes. He only knew Dales and Blackwell vaguely.

After Thursday’s memorial service in Grundy, Campbell said he and another alumnus walked through the building where the shootings took place. At Sutin’s office, where the door was locked, crayon drawings were hanging on the wall, the work of his young, adopted son.

“It’s just a sad situation,” Campbell said. “As far as the school goes, I think the administration has proven to be resilient during difficult times. But I think the school will bounce back and grow stronger.”

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Three dead in law school shooting


United Press International

A former student opened fire at a small law school in southwest Virginia on Tuesday, killing three people, including the school’s dean, and seriously wounding three others.

Appalachian School of Law Dean L. Anthony Sutin, Associate Professor Thomas Blackwell and a student were killed, officials said. Grundy police said three people were critically wounded and were taken to two hospitals in the region.

The alleged gunman opened fire with a semi-automatic pistol, school officials said. He was overpowered by students who saw the shootings. He was taken into custody by a town policeman.

“The whole school just came together to help out with the situation. There were quite a few heroes,” student Justin Marlowe said.

Names of the student victims were not being released pending notification of their families, officials said.

“The ASL community is profoundly shocked and saddened by this tragedy. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family and friends of the victims,” the school said in a statement.

Virginia Gov. Mark Warner, who served on the board of the law school until he took office this week, called the shootings “a great tragedy.”

“We deplore this senseless act of violence,” said Warner, who was scheduled to formally resign from the law school board at a meeting on Wednesday night.

A memorial service for those killed in the shootings was planned for midday Thursday at Grundy Baptist Church, which is located beside the school’s library.

Classes at the school were canceled until Tuesday, Jan. 22. The school planned to have grief counselors available on campus beginning on Thursday morning.

Dr. Jack Briggs, a Buchanan County coroner, told CNN that Sutin and Blackwell were shot separately in their offices. He said he believed they were killed execution-style because of the powder marks on their clothing.

“It looked like a war zone. There was blood all over,” said Briggs, a four-year Navy veteran. He said the alleged shooter was a former patient and was a “time bomb” who complained of stress.

A student described the alleged gunman as “kind of a loner” who was “hard to approach.”

Sutin, a graduate of Harvard Law School and Brandeis University, was a former acting assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice before he became the law school’s dean.

Before joining the government, Sutin was a partner in a Washington, D.C., law firm, where he specialized in civil litigation.

Blackwell was a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington and the Duke University School of Law who specialized in business organizations, intellectual property and technology law. He was an attorney in Dallas before joining the law school.

The Appalachian School of Law opened Aug. 11, 1997, in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town with two traffic lights and a population of 1,118.

Grundy, located in a mountainous area about 260 miles west of Richmond, Va., was initially a logging community and coal mining town, but was heavily damaged in a 1977 flood that damaged 228 structures.

“Grundy is a community that has faced adversity in the past,” Warner said. Content: 02001000 05007000

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3 Shot Dead, 3 Wounded in School Shooting in U.S.


Xinhua General News Service

Three were killed and three other wounded when a gunman opened fire at a law school in southwestern Virginia Wednesday.

The gunman, a student at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia, was described as “a time bomb” by a local doctor who recently treated him for stress.

One of those killed was the dean of the school, L. Anthony Sutin, a former acting assistant U.S. attorney general. Another faculty member and a student were also killed, said Ellen Qualls, press secretary for Governor Mark Warner.

“The dean of the law school had been executed in his office and a professor had been executed in his office,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, a coroner for Buchanan County. “The man then came down the stairs—before we got there—and shot four students.”

The suspected gunman was handed over to police after being tackled by students at the tiny school of about 170 students. Briggs said the shooter was a foreign student who had difficulty during his first year and had flunked out.

Briggs, who is a physician, said he had treated this student for stress about six months ago. “He was a time bomb waiting to go off,” the physician said.

The three wounded students were taken to Buchanan General Hospital and later transferred to other hospitals for treatment. Two of them were in surgery and the third was in fair condition, according to hospital officials..

Sutin had served as acting general counsel for the Democratic Party and a lawyer for the 1992 presidential campaign of Bill Clinton. He also held various positions in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he was appointed acting assistant attorney general for legislative affairs by then U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno.

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Gunman shoots six at Grundy college


The Associated Press State & Local Wire

A gunman went on a shooting spree Wednesday at the Appalachian School of Law, killing three people, including the dean, before the suspect was apprehended by students, officials said.

Among the dead was L. Anthony Sutin, dean of the school established in 1997, said Ellen Qualls, spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, a former member of the school’s board. Also killed were a student and another member of the faculty, she said.

Three students were wounded and taken to Buchanan General Hospital, Qualls said. She said the shooter used a .380 semiautomatic handgun.

“I’m shocked and deeply saddened,” the governor said in a statement. “I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect, who is now in custody. My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

A man who answered the phone at the law school refused to comment.

“We knew before we heard there was a shooting that something was wrong,” said Tiffany Street, a worker at a nearby motel. “There were fire trucks, ambulances, state police and cops all heading toward the school. They had everything roped off and the gates closed. They weren’t letting anyone through.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Street, 20. “Grundy’s a very small town, and I’ve been here all my life.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was dean and associate professor of law at the Grundy school. He previously worked on election law and campaign finance issues at the Hogan & Hartson law firm in Washington, D.C. He worked for the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton presidential campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

Sutin was formerly acting assistant attorney general for the office of legal affairs at the Department of Justice. He left the department to help found the Appalachian School of Law, department officials said.

Previously he had been deputy director of the community policing program.

The Buchanan County law school opened in 1997 in a renovated junior high school in the mountain town with 1,100 residents. The school’s enrollment is about 170.

The school was opened with the hope of easing a historic shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of far southwest Virginia, as well as help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia.

The school has about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

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Three slain, three wounded during shooting spree at law school

Roger Alford
The Associated Press State & Local Wire

A law school student went on a shooting spree Wednesday, killing three people and critically wounding three others before he was wrestled to the ground by students, officials said.

The victims included the dean of the Appalachian School of Law and a professor who were gunned down in their offices. The third person slain was a student, said Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, who has a private practice a half-mile from the school in this tiny western Virginia community.

Briggs said he had treated the suspect in the past year. He described the gunman as a Nigerian in his early 40s who had flunked out last year and been allowed to return.

“I think they were getting ready to tell him that he had not made the grade this year,” Briggs said.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and the professor were “executed” in their offices, Briggs said.

He said the gunman then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing one and wounding three others. He was tackled by some male students as he left the building.

“They just wanted the guy,” Briggs said. “They weren’t worried about their own personal safety.”

Qualls said the weapon used was a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun.

The three wounded students were in critical condition, Gov. Mark Warner told reporters in Richmond.

“We knew before we heard there was a shooting that something was wrong,” said Tiffany Street, who works at a nearby motel. “There were fire trucks, ambulances, state police and cops all heading toward the school.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Street, 20. “Grundy’s a very small town, and I’ve been here all my life.”

The private law school has an enrollment of about 170 students.

The governor, who had served on the school’s board until he took office last week, said he was shocked and saddened by the shooting.

“I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect, who is now in custody,” Warner said. “My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School founders hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999.

The school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000. There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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Shooting rampage at law school kills three, wounds three others

Roger Alford
The Associated Press State & Local Wire

A struggling law school student who had just been suspended went on a shooting spree at the school Wednesday, killing the dean, a professor and a student before he was wrestled to the ground, school officials and witnesses said.

Three students also were critically wounded in the hail of gunfire at the Appalachian School of Law.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” said Dr. Jack Briggs, who has a private practice a half-mile from the school in this tiny mountain community in western Virginia.

Dean L. Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. The third person slain was a student, said Ellen Qualls, a spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner.

Briggs said he had treated the suspect - identified by state police as 43-year-old Peter Odighizuma - in the past year. He described the gunman as a Nigerian who had flunked out last year and been allowed to return.

Odighizuma had been suspended from school earlier Wednesday, Qualls said. She said Odighizuma had a history of mental instability that school officials were aware of.

The suspect was at the Buchanan County Jail. No charges were immediately announced.

The dean and the professor were “executed” in their offices, according to Briggs. He said the gunman then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd of students, killing one and wounding three others.

The gunman was tackled by four male students as he left the building.

“They just wanted the guy,” Briggs said. “They weren’t worried about their own personal safety.”

The wounded students were hospitalized in critical condition, the governor said. Qualls said the weapon used was a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun.

The private law school, with an enrollment of about 170 students, was closed for the rest of the week.

Justin Marlowe, a first-year law student from Richwood, W.Va., said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

He also said Odighizuma had flunked out a year ago and “the dean bent over backward to get him enrolled again.”

The governor, who had served on the school’s board until he took office last week, said he was shocked and saddened by the shooting.

“I commend the students who acted swiftly to apprehend the suspect, who is now in custody,” Warner said. “My heart goes out to the school and the community. I know that such a close-knit community will feel such a tragedy especially deeply.”

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, was also an associate professor at the school. He left the Justice Department to found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

“My thoughts and prayers go out to Mr. Sutin’s wife, Margaret, their two children and to all of their family and friends,” Attorney General John Ashcroft said in a statement.

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School founders hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999.

The school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000. There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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Associated Press
The Associated Press State & Local Wire

Authorities said Peter Odighizuwa, a student at the Appalachian School of Law, shot the dean, a professor and four students Wednesday, the day his dismissed from school went into effect.

Here is a timeline of the events leading to the dismissal, according to Chris Clifton, financial aid officer at the school:

-Fall 2000: Odighizuwa is put on academic probation.

-Spring 2001: Odighizuwa is dismissed.

-Fall 2001: Odighizuwa is reinstated after appealing his dismissal.

-Tuesday, Jan. 15: Odighizuwa is dismissed for good after failing to maintain the necessary grades.

-Wednesday, Jan. 16: Authorities said Odighizuwa came to the school to meet with the dean and went on a shooting spree, killing three people and wounding three more.

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Three slain, three wounded during shooting spree at western Virginia law school

Roger Alford
The Associated Press State & Local Wire

A student who had been dismissed from law school went on a shooting spree Wednesday, killing the school’s dean, a professor and a student before other students tackled him, officials said.

Three students were injured in the hail of gunfire.

L. Anthony Sutin, dean of the Appalachian School of Law, and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. The third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33, of Vansant, said State Police spokesman Mike Stater.

The suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, went to the school to meet with Sutin about his dismissal, which went into effect Wednesday, authorities said. Odighizuwa first stopped by the office of Professor Dale Rubin to talk about his grades, and as he left he reportedly asked Rubin to pray for him, Stater said.

Rubin, reached by telephone, declined to comment.

After visiting Rubin, Odighizuwa went to Sutin’s and Blackwell’s offices and shot them both with a .380-caliber pistol, Stater said.

Odighizuwa then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd, said Dr. Jack Briggs, who has a private practice a half-mile from the school.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” Briggs said.

Briggs said he had treated Odighizuwa in the past year. He described the Odighizuwa as a Nigerian who had flunked out last year and been allowed to return. Odighizuwa was known on campus as “Peter O” and was a naturalized U.S. citizen, authorities and students said.

He is being held in the Buchanan County Jail on three counts of capital murder and three counts of using a firearm in the commission of a felony, authorities said. Ellen Qualls, spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, said Odighizuwa, 42, had a history of mental instability that school officials were aware of.

After the shootings, Odighizuwa left the building and was tackled and held down by several male students, including 30-year-old Todd Ross of Johnson City, Tenn.

“He came out and walked down on the sidewalk, had his hands up in the air with the gun. At some point I yelled his name and told him to drop the gun and to get on the ground,” Ross said.

Odighizuwa dropped the gun, and another student then confronted him and distracted him.

“And then I ran across and tackled him,” Ross said.

Two or three other students then helped him subdue Odighizuwa.

Odighizuwa “struggled after we got him on the ground, but then just laid there,” Ross said. He said Odighizuwa kept shouting, ‘“I have nowhere to go. I have nowhere to go.”’

School president Lucius Ellsworth was in Richmond for a meeting with government officials Wednesday and flew back to Grundy when he learned about the shootings.

“Each of us is suffering, but as a family, we can find strength to pass through this terrible dark and tragic valley,” he told reporters at an evening news conference.

Hospital officials identified the three wounded students as Rebecca Brown, 38, of Roanoke; Martha Madeline Short, 37, of Grundy; and Stacy Beans, 22, of Berea, Ky. Amy Stevens, a spokeswoman for Wellmont Health Systems, said Short was in fair condition, and Beans and Brown were in fair condition after surgery Wednesday evening.

Justin Marlowe, a first-year law student from Richwood, W.Va., said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

Marlowe said Odighizuwa had flunked out of school a year ago and “the dean bent over backwards to get him enrolled again.”

Blackwell, the professor who was killed, taught classes in contracts that Odighizuwa took during the fall and winter up to the time of his dismissal, students said.

The private law school has an enrollment of about 170 students. It will be closed the remainder of the week, officials said. Local elementary, middle and high schools were locked down for an hour after the shootings.

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, also was an associate professor at the school. He left a Justice Department position as an assistant attorney general to found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

“My thoughts and prayers go out to Mr. Sutin’s wife, Margaret, their two children and to all of their family and friends,” said Attorney General John Ashcroft.

“The entire Department of Justice is mourning the loss of a dedicated public servant who served the Department of Justice with distinction, integrity and honor.”

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School founders hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999.

The school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000. There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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Shooting rampage at Va. law school kills 3, wounds 3 others

Roger Alford
The Associated Press State & Local Wire

A student who had been dismissed from law school went on a shooting spree Wednesday, killing the school’s dean, a professor and a student before other students tackled him, officials said.

Three students, including one from Kentucky, were injured in the hail of gunfire.

L. Anthony Sutin, dean of the Appalachian School of Law, and Professor Thomas Blackwell were gunned down in their offices, according to school officials. The third person slain was student Angela Dales, 33, of Vansant, said State Police spokesman Mike Stater.

The suspect, Peter Odighizuwa, went to the school to meet with Sutin about his dismissal, which went into effect Wednesday, authorities said. Odighizuwa first stopped by the office of Professor Dale Rubin to talk about his grades, and as he left he reportedly asked Rubin to pray for him, Stater said.

Rubin, reached by telephone, declined to comment.

After visiting Rubin, Odighizuwa went to Sutin’s and Blackwell’s offices and shot them both with a .380-caliber pistol, Stater said.

Odighizuwa then went downstairs into a common area and opened fire on a crowd, said Dr. Jack Briggs, who has a private practice a half-mile from the school.

“When I got there there were bodies laying everywhere,” Briggs said.

Briggs said he had treated Odighizuwa in the past year. He described the Odighizuwa as a Nigerian who had flunked out last year and been allowed to return. Odighizuwa was known on campus as “Peter O” and was a naturalized U.S. citizen, authorities and students said.

He is being held in the Buchanan County Jail on three counts of capital murder and three counts of using a firearm in the commission of a felony, authorities said. Ellen Qualls, spokeswoman for Gov. Mark Warner, said Odighizuwa, 42, had a history of mental instability that school officials were aware of.

After the shootings, Odighizuwa left the building and was tackled and held down by several male students, including 30-year-old Todd Ross of Johnson City, Tenn.

“He came out and walked down on the sidewalk, had his hands up in the air with the gun. At some point I yelled his name and told him to drop the gun and to get on the ground,” Ross said.

Odighizuwa dropped the gun, and another student then confronted him and distracted him.

“And then I ran across and tackled him,” Ross said.

Two or three other students then helped him subdue Odighizuwa.

Odighizuwa “struggled after we got him on the ground, but then just laid there,” Ross said. He said Odighizuwa kept shouting, ‘“I have nowhere to go. I have nowhere to go.”’

School president Lucius Ellsworth was in Richmond for a meeting with government officials Wednesday and flew back to Grundy when he learned about the shootings.

“Each of us is suffering, but as a family, we can find strength to pass through this terrible dark and tragic valley,” he told reporters at an evening news conference.

Hospital officials identified the three wounded students as Rebecca Brown, 38, of Roanoke; Martha Madeline Short, 37, of Grundy; and Stacy Beans, 22, of Berea, Ky. Amy Stevens, a spokeswoman for Wellmont Health Systems, said Short was in fair condition, and Beans and Brown were in fair condition after surgery Wednesday evening.

Beans is a 1997 graduate of Paducah Tilghman High School and graduated last year from Berea College, The Paducah Sun reported in a story to be published Thursday.

Justin Marlowe, a first-year law student from Richwood, W.Va., said the suspect had been in all of his classes.

“He was a real quiet guy who kept to himself. He didn’t talk to anybody, but he gave no indication that he was capable of something like this,” Marlowe said.

Marlowe said Odighizuwa had flunked out of school a year ago and “the dean bent over backwards to get him enrolled again.”

Blackwell, the professor who was killed, taught classes in contracts that Odighizuwa took during the fall and winter up to the time of his dismissal, students said.

The private law school has an enrollment of about 170 students. It will be closed the remainder of the week, officials said. Local elementary, middle and high schools were locked down for an hour after the shootings.

Sutin, a 1984 graduate of Harvard Law School, also was an associate professor at the school. He left a Justice Department position as an assistant attorney general to found the school after working for the Democratic National Committee and Bill Clinton’s campaign in 1992, according to the Web site of Jurist, the Legal Education Network.

“My thoughts and prayers go out to Mr. Sutin’s wife, Margaret, their two children and to all of their family and friends,” said Attorney General John Ashcroft.

“The entire Department of Justice is mourning the loss of a dedicated public servant who served the Department of Justice with distinction, integrity and honor.”

The school opened five years ago in a renovated junior high school in Grundy, a town of about 1,100 just a few miles south of the Kentucky and West Virginia state lines.

School founders hope to ease a shortage of lawyers in the coalfields of southwest Virginia, help change the region’s image and foster renewal in Appalachia. The American Bar Association rejected the school’s first application for accreditation in 1999.

The school graduated its first class of 34 in 2000. There are about 15 faculty members, including alumni of law schools at the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia, Harvard and Howard universities.

“You read about it in other areas, but when it comes home it really hurts,” said state Del. Jackie Stump of Grundy, fighting back tears as he hung his head and walked away from a news conference in Richmond.

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