Knives and Guns

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Are stab wounds as dangerous as gun shot wounds?



In article <qa1RTc1w165w@aroga.wimsey.com> orion@aroga.wimsey.com (Orion) writes:

> ljuno@dnbf01.dev.cdx.mot.com (Lance Juno) writes:
> > I imagine that the desire to remove guns, with the statistical chance you 
> > show, is largely due to the fact that being shot is probably, IMHO, one of
> > the most vulgar ways of one person to assault another person.
 
>   Wrong...being stabbed is.
 
>   Statscan tells us that of all violent assaults that are *not* 
> immediately fatal your odds of survival are better if you are shot rather 
> than stabbed (some people aren't even immediately aware that they *have* 
> been shot!).  Knife wounds tend to be large, ugly and tough to repair ass 
> opposed to neat little bullet entry wounds, depending on location, 
> calibre and other factors..

Perhaps you could tell us more about what your source says and how it
came to that conclusion.

I looked in Medline for studies on gun shot and stab wound mortality
and it turned up dozens.  There was a consistent pattern across
different countries and wound locations -- gunshot wounds were far
more lethal.  For example a study in The Journal of Trauma (36:4
pp516-524) looked at all injury admissions to a Seattle hospital over
a six year period.  The mortality rate for gunshot wounds was 22%
while that for stab wounds was 4%.  Even among patients that survived,
gunshot wounds were more serious -- the mean cost of treatment for
these patients was more than twice that for stab wounds.

Repairing a large entry wound (like from a knife) or a small entry
wound (like from a bullet) is not very difficult in either case.  What
is difficult is repairing vital organs.  Large low-velocity things
like knives tend to push them out the way, while small high-velocity
things like bullets plow right into them.

Tim


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