Proposal to Introduce a New Course (formerly known as subject)

1. Course Details

1.1 Course ID COMP1811

 

1.2 Course name - Long 

Computing for Engineers

 

1.3 Course Name - Abbreviated

Computing for Engineers

 

1.4 Course Authority

ext/email

Ashesh Mahidadia

56556 / ashesh@cse.unsw.edu.au

Geoff Whale

54046 / geoffw@cse.unsw.edu.au

 

1.5 Organisational Unit responsible for course

School School of Computer Science and Engineering

Faculty  Faculty of Engineering

Academic Group Code(Faculty) ENG

Academic Organisation Code (Owner)  CSE

 

1.6 Justification of Proposal

Overview

COMP1811 is the first computing course for engineering students (non-CS/EE), and it broadly covers the following topics:

·         Introduction to procedural programming (using Visual Basic) to solve engineering tasks

·         Introduction to popular applications (such as spreadsheets and database) to solve computational problems in engineering

·         Introduction to some of the current and emerging Information Technologies, with the aim to understand their limitations/advantages and how they could be exploited to innovatively and effectively solve engineering problems

COMP1811 is designed such that students in the common first year program will be able to acquire the required breadth and depth of IT skills for engineering tasks. Importantly, if they wish, they can continue on doing more advanced computing courses like COMP1921 and COMP2911.  

Inputs

Cannot assume anything other than basic level of intelligence and interest. Maybe not even interest initially. Prerequisites: none
Co requisites: none

Outputs (minimum coverage)

Prequisite for:  COMP1921 (Data Structures and Algorithms), Digital System Structures, Bioinformatics 1
Corequisite for: none

Coverage

  • History of Computing and Digital Revolution
  • Networks and the Internet (including introduction to HTML/XML/CSS)
  • Spreadsheets: Basics of a Spreadsheet; introduction to filters, Charts, Ranges and Predefined functions (statistical, strings, lookup, etc); Analyzing Data – Pivot Tables, What-If Analysis, Goal Seek and Solver;
  • Problem Solving and Programming: Introduction to procedural programming, Data Types, Variables and Constants, Operators and Statements, Selection (IF statements) and Iteration (Loop statements), Modularity using Functions/Subprograms, Parameter passing, Program Design, Development, Testing and Debugging, Arrays (single and multi dimensional), Strings, Input/Output and Managing Files, Problem Solving Case Studies
  • Databases: introduction and case studies.
  • Introduction to some of the current and emerging Information Technologies: understand the limitations and advantages of them, how they could be exploited to innovatively and effectively solve engineering problems.

 

Assurance - What

At the end students MUST be able to write small correct VB programs with good style given a clear problem specification. Use applications like spreadsheets and databases to effectively solve computational problems in engineering. Understand limitations/advantages of the emerging IT technologies, and how to exploit them for engineering problems.

Assurance - How

Practical/Written exam at end of course. Entry test/quiz in the following course (Data Structures and Algorithms).

Higher Version

Currently we are not planning to run a higher version of this course.  However, this may change depending on the future experiences/feedback. 

 

1.7 Consultation Process

School Teaching Committee, Discussions with other Engg Schools and their relevant academics.

 

 

1.8 Units of credit (UOC) Session/s Offered   Hours Per Week

6 UOC  S1 S2 ,5

 

 

1.9

Pre-requisites None

 

Co-requisites None

 

Exclusions  COMP1911, COMP1021, COMP1721, COMP1091, COMP1917

 

 

1.10 Proposed Entry in the Faculty Handbook

Course ID COMP1811

Course Name Computing for Engineers

Staff Contact Ashesh Mahidadia ,Geoff Whale

Units of Credit: 6

Session/s offered:  S1 S2    Mode:

 

The objective of this course is for engineering students to acquire sufficient computing skills that allow them to effectively solve computational problems in engineering. Topics covered include:     introduction to procedural programming to solve engineering tasks, introduction to popular applications (such as spreadsheets and database) to solve computational problems in engineering, introduction to some of the current and emerging Information Technologies, with the aim to understand their limitations/advantages and how they could be exploited to innovatively and effectively solve engineering problems.

No prior computing background is required.

 

1.11 Is this course replacing an existing course?

NO

 

 

1.12 Undergraduate

 

 

1.13 Core

 

 

1.14 Program Stage

Offered Year 2006  Stage 1, first offered 2006s1

 

 

1.15 Program/s in which course will be available

All programs

 

 

1.16 Proposed teaching methods and assessment practices

Lectures, Laboratory Classes, Tutorials, Assignments, and a formal exam.

 

 

1.17 Assessment grades to be used

Full range of Grades  

 

1.18 Mode of delivery

Internal 

1.18.1 Multi-mode Delivery Guidelines

N/A

 

1.19 Information Technology Requirements for students

Standard resources available in school.

 

 

1.20 Textbooks

Text

(the following textbook is available in the UNSW library - PQ 005.268/WIN/9 B)

 

Author: Schneider, David I.  

Title: An introduction to programming using Visual Basic 6.0

Edition: Update, 4th ed.  

Publication Details:  Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall, 2004. 

ISBN: 0131427075 ( 0131219189  pbk.)

 

Reference

 

(all the following reference books are available online as  “Safari Tech Books Online” in the UNSW library.)

 

1.

Special Edition Using Microsoft® Office XP

By Ed Bott, Woody Leonhard

...............................................

Publisher: Que

Pub Date: May 22, 2001

ISBN: 0-7897-2513-4

Pages: 1184

Slots: 1.0

 

2.

Special Edition Using Microsoft® Access 2002

By Roger Jennings

...............................................

Publisher: Que

Pub Date: June 21, 2001

ISBN: 0-7897-2510-X

Pages: 1406

Slots: 1.0

 

3.

Special Edition Using Microsoft® Excel™ 2002

By Patrick Blattner

...............................................

Publisher: Que

Pub Date: May 18, 2001

ISBN: 0-7897-2511-8

Pages: 976

Slots: 1.0

 

 

 

1.21 Industrial experience component

None

 

 

2. Resource Statement

 

 

2.1 Enrolments

Estimated or Proposed enrolments for the next three years

2006: 600, 2007: 600,
2008: 600 

 

 

2.2 Resource Requirements

Staffing Requirements

 

Full time Academic Staff  3 hrs/week

 

Part-time Teaching Staff  2 hrs/week

 

General Staff  0 hrs/week

 

Comments

Resource requirements as for the course being replaced

 

Field Costs   N/A

 

 

Studio/Laboratory Requirements

already available

 

Materials Requirements

N/A

 

 

Equipment Costs

N/A

 

 

Computing Requirements

already available

 

 

Library Requirements

Standard for CSE courses; already available.

 

 

Capital Funds requirements

None.

 

 

2.3 Servicing Implications

N/A

 

 

2.4 Teaching Arrangements

No additional resources required

 

 

2.5 Alternative Delivery Arrangements

N/A

 

 

2.6 Details of Tuition Fees

Proposed fee: Standard for an engineering course of this type.