PROPOSAL TO INTRODUCE A NEW COURSE
 
1. COURSE DETAILS
 
1.1Course ID
COM3451/9451
 
1.2 Course name - Long
 
Theory of Computation through Prolog
 
1.3 Course name - Abbreviated
 
Theory of Computation through Prolog
 
1.4 Course Authority ext/email
 
Eric Martin 56936/emartin@cse.unsw.edu.au
Arthur Ramer 56875/ramer@cse.unsw.edu.au
1.5 Organisational Unit responsible for course
 
School: CSE Faculty: Engineering
 
Academic Group Code (Faculty): ENG
 
Academic Organisation Code (Owner): COMPSC
 
1.6 Justification of Proposal
 
The course will replace COMP2411 Logic and logic programming and COMP4141 Theory of Computation. COMP4141 has not been offered in its present form for a few years; COMP2411 will not be offered after 2005. There is a need to redesign both courses for a wider audience from their current more specialised orientation.
The course will satisfy two main objectives
*provide formal foundations for several fields of computer science, with applications to compiler design, algorithm analysis and artificial intelligence;
*provide practical introduction to Prolog as tool for rapid prototyping.
 
We aim at presenting in an interlinked fashion the theoretical material of computation theory together with Prolog methods to be used for modeling of examples and problem solutions.
In this form the proposed course would fill a significant gap in the current curriculum.
 
1.7 Consultation Process
 
Consultation had followed that conducted when COMP2411 and COMP4141 were established. The main relevant party is School of Mathematics. Discussion with A/Prof James Franklin shows no conflict in topics or in targeted students.
 
1.8 Units of credit (UOC) Session/s offered Hours Per Week
 
6 Both sessions 3 hours
 
 
1.9 Pre-requisites: MATH1081 Discrete mathematics
Co-requisites: None
Exclusions: None
 
1.10 Proposed Entry in the Faculty Handbook
 

Units of credit: 6; Hours per week: 3
Prerequisites: MATH1081
Exclusion: None

The course will satisfy two main objectives: (i) to provide formal foundations for several fields of computer science, with applications to compiler design, algorithm analysis and artificial intelligence; (ii) to provide practical introduction to Prolog as tool for rapid prototyping.
The topics can be grouped into: Computability - models of computation, decidability and undecidability, complexity classes; Prolog - declarative programming and metaprogramming, prototyping, problem solving.

 
 
1.11 Is this course replacing an existing course?
 
 
YES
 
 
COMP2411 Logic and logic programming
COMP4141 Theory of Computation
 
1.12Undergraduate / Postgraduate
 
1.13 Elective
 
1.14 Program stage
 
Stage 3 in UG programs, Stage 2 in CompIT courses, Stage 1 in MIT and GradCertIT; Year 2005 (both sessions)
 
1.15 Program/s in which course is be available
 
Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Software Engineering, and combined programs that include one of these, MIT, MCompIT, GradDipCompIT, GradCertIT
 
1.16 Proposed teaching methods and assessment practices
 
Examinable
 
1.17 Assessment grades to be used
 
Full range of grades
 
1.18 Mode of delivery
 
Internal
 
 
X
 
 
 
1.19 Information Technology Requirements for students
 
Standard access to computing facilities of the CSE

1.20
Textbooks
 
Required:
H Lewis and C Papadimitriou. Elements of Theory of Computation. Pearson 1997.
 
Recommended:
J Hopcroft, R Montawani and J Ullman. Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation. Pearson 2000.
L Sterling and E Shapiro. The Art of Prolog. The MIT Press 1997.
 
1.21 Industrial experience component
 
N/A
 
2. RESOURCE STATEMENT
 
2.1 Enrolments
Estimated or proposed enrolments for the next three years.
 
 
2005: 30
 
 
2006: 30
 
 
2006: 30
 
 
2.2 Resource Requirements
 
Staffing Requirements:
 
Hours per week
 
6 hours - Full-time Academic Staff (lectures, advanced tutorial and consultation)
 
 
2 hours - Part-time Teaching Staff (2 standard tutorials)
 
 
 
2.3 Servicing Implications:
 
N/A
 
2.4 Teaching Arrangements:
 
Will other units contribute on a regular basis to the teaching of this course?
 
NO
 
 
X
 
 
2.5 Alternative Delivery Arrangements:
 
Not considered for 2005-06 sessions
 
2.6 Details of Tuition Fees:
 
N/A no non-award enrolment is anticipated

3. AUTHORISATION
 
3.1 University Librarian's Endorsement
 
I have examined the Library needs related to the above proposal and certify that existing Library holdings, staffing, services and accommodation are adequate to cover the demands that are inherent in it.
 
Appropriate arrangements for the use of digitised material to support this course have been made by the Course Authority with the University Librarian.
 
 
 
University Librarian
/ /2004
 
 
3.2 Head of School's Approval
 
 
I have examined the resource implications of the above proposal in regard to staff, space, materials, equipment, capital funds, and computing, and certify that the School can cover the demands that are inherent in it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Head of School
/ /2004
 
3.3 Dean's Approval
 
I have examined the resource implications of the above proposal in regard to staff, space, materials, equipment, capital funds, and computing, and certify that:
 
 
3.3.1the proposal involves no additional resources;
 
3.3.2a fee will not be charged for this program (other than HECS);
 
3.3.3 the proposal conforms to the University's commitment to Equal Opportunity in Education.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dean
/ /2004